Montefí Talayotic settlement

Ciutadella de Menorca, Spain

Montefí is a Talayotic settlement (1000-700 B.C.) that was occupied until the Roman conquest in 123 B.C., although the site may have been occupied at other times during the island’s early Prehistoric era. It must have been one of the largest settlements near Ciutadella harbour. Today, three talaiots survive, each one with its own distinctive architectural features. You can also go into some of the artificial underground caves in the large necropolis.When the Ronda Sur road works were underway in 2005, remains of a post-Talayotic (650-123 B.C.) storage area were unearthed, with water tanks, cisterns and channels carved into the rock.Next to the talayot at the entrance there is a “pont de bestiar”, a 19th century local construction used in connection with livestock farming.

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