St. Malachy's Church

Belfast, United Kingdom

Saint Malachy's Church is the third oldest Catholic Church in the city of Belfast. The foundation stone was laid in 1841. On December 15, 1844 Dr William Crolly, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland dedicated the building.

The church is regarded as one of the finest examples of Tudor Revival churches in Ireland. It was designed by Thomas Jackson of Waterford and it is in the ecclesiastical style of the Tudor period. It is cruciform in shape, 113 feet wide, 52 feet wide and 40 feet high. The original High Altar, Pulpit and Altar Rails were of Irish Oak however they were replaced with marble when the Church was renovated in 1926. All that remains of the original ornaments is the canopy over the pulpit which has been painted white to match the marble of the present altar furnishings. The Sanctuary floor is mosaic, the principal colour being blue. At the foot of the Altar is a pelican, a common Christian symbol of sacrifice.

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Details

Founded: 1841-1844
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Danny Boyd (3 years ago)
It's my holy grail.home away from home next door in st George's boxing club.
mourne film (3 years ago)
Beautiful setting for a wedding. And well worth a quick vist just to see the stunning painting and architectural work inside.
mick bake (3 years ago)
Well worth a visit to this splendid Catholic Chapel in the heart of Belfast. Great recoco plasterwork, but Fr. Michael's Service and Sermons are a must those of any religion.
Anqela Wallace (3 years ago)
Architectural jewel in middle of Belfast. Beautiful church. Lovely Easter services. Well worth a visit!
Zphira Kam (3 years ago)
Beautiful Church, build in the Romantic architectural style. Warm and welcoming diocese. Absolutely worth a visit whether you are A Catholic or not.
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