Mtatsminda Pantheon

Tbilisi, Georgia

The Mtatsminda Pantheon of Writers and Public Figures is a necropolis in Tbilisi, where some of the most prominent writers, artists, scholars, and national heroes of Georgia are buried. It is located in the churchyard around St David’s Church 'Mamadaviti' on the slope of Mount Mtatsminda and was officially established in 1929. Atop the mountain is Mtatsminda Park, an amusement park owned by the municipality of Tbilisi.

The first celebrities to be buried at this place were the Russian writer Alexander Griboyedov (1795–1829) and his Georgian wife Nino Chavchavadze (1812–1857). The Pantheon was officially opened in 1929 to celebrate the centenary of Griboyedov’s death in Iran. Since then, several illustrious Georgians have been buried or reburied there. The Pantheon is administered by the Government of Tbilisi and is frequented by locals as well as the city’s visitors.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1929
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Otar Melia (5 months ago)
Famous Georgian's Cemetery
Gautami Biswas (5 months ago)
One can reach this place by taking a ride on a funicular by paying one lari or simply walk up through the steeply winding hill, like we did. From the top you get amazing views of the city. There is a small church also that is pretty charming. Overall a very nice place to visit.
Ilia Chkadua (6 months ago)
My best place
VladimirZ (8 months ago)
Good place to spend with a kids. Nice view on city, Caucasian range seen if weather is clear. Beautiful park
Gelo Petsvona (9 months ago)
Wow, this place is awesome, if you can get there. We walked up a really steep hill, but if you can you should visit a small chapel on the right side of the church. It is really cool. You will need to listen to a preacher for a couple of minutes and make a small donation, but than you will be able to see what we saw. Take a look at my pictures.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château de Fougères

The Château de Fougères is an impressive castle with curtain wall and 13 towers. It had three different enclosures, first for defensive purposes, second for day to day usages in peacetime and for safety of the surrounding populations in times of siege, the last enclosure was where the keep was situated.

The first wooden fort was built by the House of Amboise in the 11th century. It was destroyed in 1166 after it was besieged and taken by King Henry II of England. It was immediately rebuilt by Raoul II Baron de Fougères. Fougères was not involved in the Hundred Years' War until 1449 when the castle was taken by surprise by an English mercenary. In 1488 the French troops won the castle back after a siege and the castle lost its military role.

In the late 18th century the castle was turned into a prison. The owner in this period was the Baron Pommereul. In the 19th century the outer ward became an immense landscaped garden. A museum was established in the Mélusine Tower. During the Industrial Revolution, a shoe factory set up shop in the castle grounds.

The City of Fougères took ownership of the Château in 1892. It had been a listed Historical Monument since 1862. A major campaign was launched to clean up the castle walls. While the castle had retained many of its original features, some of the curtain walls needed to be cleared and certain sections required major repairs. The changes made in the 18th century were "reversed," and the castle was finally open to visitors. The first campaign of archaeological excavations, conducted in 1925, unearthed the ruins of the manor house.

Since then, the Château de Fougères has welcomed tens of thousands of visitors every year. The castle's excellent state of conservation, and the historical interest of its architecture, make Fougères an invaluable window onto the Middle Ages. From great lords to simple builders, generations of inhabitants have left their mark on these walls.