Temple of Augustus

Pula, Croatia

The Temple of Augustus is a well-preserved Roman temple in the city of Pula. Dedicated to the first Roman emperor, Augustus, it was probably built during the emperor's lifetime at some point between 27 BC and his death in AD 14. It was built on a podium with a tetrastyle prostyle porch of Corinthian columns and measures about 8 by 17.3 m, and 14 m high. The richly decorated frieze is similar to that of a somewhat larger and more recent temple, the Maison Carrée in Nîmes, France. These two temples are considered the two best complete Roman monuments outside Italy.

 

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Address

Forum Square, Pula, Croatia
See all sites in Pula

Details

Founded: 27 BCE - 14 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Carey (2 years ago)
Peaceful relaxing square in front of the Temple is ideal for chilling out.wonderful food and drinks available too.
Anwen Brown (2 years ago)
Beautiful monument set in a lovely square - ideal for a cool drink & a bit of people watching
Jordan Quinn (2 years ago)
My wife and I both loved the Temple of Augustus. We're both history fanatics, so a two-thousand year old structure like this was really a cool thing to behold. We paid the 10 Kuna per person fee to get inside and have a look around at some of the artifacts and left over relics from the Roman eras of Pula's past. Bottom line: if you're a history fan, absolutely take a few minutes to check this place out. The museum inside of the temple is very small (as you can see from outside the temple isn't enormous in size) but well worth the less than two dollars it cost!
Chien Lao (2 years ago)
What a great find! Beautiful architecture! Looks great on a day when the sky is overcast :)
Gustavo Molitor Porcides (2 years ago)
In a really good shape, considering it's age. Very beautiful, in a very nice place. There's a small museum into it. Small, but totally worth visiting if you are into ancient statues. There's a small souvenirs shop inside it. Stuff isn't expensive. A really nice 10 minutes experience.
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