Palacio de San Telmo

Seville, Spain

The Palace of San Telmo is today the seat of the presidency of the Andalusian Autonomous Government. Construction of the building began in 1682 outside the walls of the city, on property belonging to the Tribunal of the Holy Office, the institution responsible for the Spanish Inquisition. It was originally constructed as the seat of the University of Navigators (Universidad de Mareantes), a school to educate orphaned children and train them as sailors.

The palace is one of the emblematic buildings of Sevillian Baroque architecture. It is built on a rectangular plan, with several interior courtyards, including a central courtyard, towers on the four corners, a chapel, and gardens. Presiding over the chapel is an early 17th-century statue of Nuestra Señora del Buen Aire.

The main façade of the palace is distinguished by the magnificent Churrigueresque entrance completed in 1754.

Atop the façade facing Calle Palos de la Frontera, across from the Hotel Alfonso XIII, are sculptures of twelve illustrious Sevillians, sculpted in 1895 by Antonio Susillo.

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Details

Founded: 1682
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gladys G (13 months ago)
If you are nearby, it's a beautiful building for your Sevilla photo book
Patrick Raymond Thierry (14 months ago)
Really interesting building but you can't go in so I would advise you go elsewhere.
Chris Sirinopwongsagon (2 years ago)
Just passing through, but looks at the building its just magnificent.
Jan Smith (3 years ago)
Impressive building that makes food photos. Guards at the gates, so I didn't ask to go inside.
Emma K (3 years ago)
I'm not sure if you can go round now it is a government building but it is pretty from the outside
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