Trolleholm Castle

Svalöv, Sweden

Trolleholm Castle (Trolleholms slott) was originally named Kattesnabbe and later Ericholm. It has been known since 1424, and was a monastic estate in the late Middle Ages. Trolleholm belonged to members of the Thott family (1533-1680) and Trolle family (1680-1806). Frederik Trolle (1693-1770) gave it its present name in 1755. The castle was reconstructed in the 1760s according the design of Carl Hårleman. The present appearance date from the late 19th century, when Trolleholm was renewed in the early Renaissance style.

During 1806 was the estate by inheritance to the family, who still owns it. The holder of the estate carry the family name Trolle-Bonde. The estate comprises 110 houses and a total of 62,800 acres (254 km2). There is a very valuable library including 40,000 books. The great garden is open to the public.

References:
  • Wikipedia
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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DLPit said 5 years ago
Really cool!!! :)


Details

Founded: 1760s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mustafa Alshouly (10 months ago)
Very nice and I like it too much.
Linda Reidy (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle and surrounds. Private grounds but lovely for taking the dog for a walk in the woods.
Donna B (2 years ago)
Great location . Stunning building Here for a wedding .. Perfect choice. Most rooms are single beds as they host conferences. Wifi is a touch slow but the location, amberance and historical layout make up for that
Jonathan Bernhardsson (2 years ago)
An awesome castle hidden away!
Douglas Williamson (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle, about 30 minute drive from Lund. Worth the drive out, well maintained and striking place
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