Santa Paula Convent

Seville, Spain

Seville has many enclosed religious complexes, but few are accessible. This is one of them, a convent set up in 1475 and still home to 40 nuns. The public is welcome to enter through two different doors in the Calle Santa Paula. Knock on the brown one, marked number 11 to look at the convent museum. Steps lead to two galleries, crammed with religious paintings and artifacts. The windows of the second look onto the nuns' cloister. The nuns make a phenomenal range of marmalades and jams which visitors may purchase in a room near the exit.

Ring the bell by the brick doorway nearby to visit the convent church, reached by crossing a meditative garden. Its portal vividly combines Gothic arches, Mudejar brickwork, Renaissance medallion and ceramics by the Italian artist, Niculoso Pisano. Inside the nave has an elaborate wooden roof and there are some fine statues here of St John the Evangelist and St John the Baptist.

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Details

Founded: 1475
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.andalucia.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Teona Serafimova (6 months ago)
Lovely, decorated church full of art works. Ring the bell and one of the nuns will let you in. They were all very kind and tolerated my very limited Spanish! Entry is €5.
Emi HRSK (7 months ago)
Bought some jams from this monastery. They are really helpful and friendly. Their jams are amazing, highly recommended
May T (2 years ago)
Went today and sadly disappointed couldn't buy any of the famous marmalade due to covid closure! I hope they open again soon! Times need to be updated in Google and their website!
Judy Rowse (3 years ago)
Deeply restful. Many artifacts.
Emily Peng (3 years ago)
The nun that greeted us was so lovely, and the treats were absolutely delightful. This place is an absolute gem.
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