Santa María Magdalena Church

Seville, Spain

Santa María Magdalena was built in 1691-1709 under design of architect Leonardo de Figueroa, above a medieval church built after the Christian conquest of the city in 1248.

The façade has three portals, one featuring a sculpture of 'St. Dominic' by Pedro Roldán. Above the portals are an oculus, sided by two blue spheres symbolizing the mystery of the rosary, and a bell-gable (1697). All the exterior of the church is characterized by a large use of blue and red decorative motifs.

The interior has a nave and two aisles, a transept, five chapels (including the only one remaining from the previous edifice, that of the Brotherhood of the Fifth Angusty) and a presbytery. The central nave is surmounted by an octagonal dome, whose exterior is decorated with fugres resembling Inca Indians. The interior of the church has a rich Baroque decoration sith stuccoes and gold patina.

The Chapel of the Dulce Nombre de Jesús has another work by Roldán and a Christ Reborn by Jerónimo Hernández. The high altar is in Baroque style (18th century), with sculptures by Pedro Duque y Cornejo and Francisco de Ocampo, while the retable of the Assumption was executed by Juan de Mesa. Other artworks include frescoes by Lucas Valdés and two canvasses by Francisco de Zurbarán

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Details

Founded: 1691-1709
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Tunison (10 months ago)
Beautiful dark church open daily for religious and cultural visits. The resplendant main altar is well lit but still very dark. Every chapel is a Spanish baroque masterpiece but the church wall are in need of restoration, the west entry interior being worked on now (early 2020). The chapel just inside the south entry, to the left is built on an older chapel, the Mudéjar style comes and tile work are not to be missed.
Cindy Puah (14 months ago)
We get to go in for free on Sun evening, as it is open for Sunday Mass. It is stunning inside, and you can imagine how rich is the Spanish empire back then.
Paul Herman (14 months ago)
Extraordinary! In a city full of extraordinary churches. Shame that they are, like so many here in Spain, doing more damage to the antique frescoes by trying to restore them than the centuries of neglect alone could do. Aside from its many treasures Santa Maria Magdalena has a strongly theatrical overall design. The decorative excitement builds through the painted figures, oversize, to a daylight - drenched golden retablo under the cupola. (Don't miss the TWO large Zurburans hidden on the inside wall of the Chapel to the right of the entrance!)
Paul Herman (14 months ago)
Extraordinary! In a city full of extraordinary churches. Shame that they are, like so many here in Spain, doing more damage to the antique frescoes by trying to restore them than the centuries of neglect alone could do. Aside from its many treasures Santa Maria Magdalena has a strongly theatrical overall design. The decorative excitement builds through the painted figures, oversize, to a daylight - drenched golden retablo under the cupola. (Don't miss the TWO large Zurburans hidden on the inside wall of the Chapel to the right of the entrance!)
Michael Kretsis (15 months ago)
Went here during Holy Week. An amazing cultural experience provided you don't mind the crowds which can be overwhelming at times.
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