San Teodoro Church

Pavia, Italy

San Teodoro is a Romanesque-style church in Pavia, Italy. A church at the site is documented since the year 752. The parish is cited in documents from the mid-13th-century. Initially the church was dedicated to Saint Agnes, but by the year 1000, it was dedicated to San Teodoro, bishop of Pavia who died in 778. The body of the saint, who is the protector of fisherman and those working in the River Ticino, is housed in the main altar.

Description

The interior has a 13th-century altarpiece of a Madonna and child. and a series of early 16th-century frescoes depicting the Life of Sant'Agnese and San Teodoro. The Apse has a painting of the Adoration of the Lamb and some saints by Antonio Villa. The church has frescoes (1507) by Bramantino and Bernardino Lanzani. The latter's fresco includes a vista of Pavia in 1525/26 replete with medieval towers.

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Details

Founded: 8th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lorraine Juan (22 months ago)
Walking alongside the path leading to this church really gives me an illusion of being in the middle ages.
Frensis Kalemaj (2 years ago)
Quiet neighborhood
p kisner (2 years ago)
Wow
paola kisner iviglia (2 years ago)
Wow
Albert King (3 years ago)
Very very old!
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