Castro de Beiro Church

Beiro, Spain

The village of Castro de Beiro, in the rural perimeter of Ourense, receives its name from an old pre-Roman settlement (castrum) on a promontory that would allow its inhabitants to have an advantageous position against attacks. On this promontory is the parish church of St. Andrew in Beiro, from which magnificent views of the surroundings can be seen. The temple falls within the so-called “classic” type of Galician Romanesque, from the early 13th century.

The gate of the main façade consists of a slightly pointed semicircular arch with checkered decoration. A tree and five birds are represented on a capital, while its opposite contains vegetal decoration. On the tympanum, despite not being complete, a part of a cross is still distinguished. On the gate the eaves are adorned with balls and supported by several corbels with vegetal motifs.

Both the southern and northern façades are arranged in a similar way: a gate with a pointed arch and a smooth tympanum. The cornice is supported by corbels adorned with geometric shapes.

The apse is centered by the semicircular window in whose capitals vegetal motifs are represented. Cornices are supported with geometric corbels and in the metopes there are variations of 4-petal flowers.

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Address

Caserio O Castro 8, Beiro, Spain
See all sites in Beiro

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismodeourense.gal

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Teresa Iglesias (4 years ago)
I adore her, she is my parish, and she has a very good Father and worried about her population
Teresa Iglesias (4 years ago)
I adore her, she is my parish, and she has a very good Father and worried about her population
Juan M. C. M. (6 years ago)
Cult place.
Juan M. C. M. (6 years ago)
Cult place.
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