St. Mary in Reza

Ourense, Spain

The parish church of St. Mary in Reza occupies a privileged position on the slopes of Mount Santa Ladaíña, in a place with beautiful views over river Miño. It was already mentioned in documentation from the 13th century. The Cathedral’s Treasures collection preserves the Virgin of Reza, a polychrome wood carving also from the 13th century, which also contributes to dating this church.

Although Romanesque in origin, this parish church was later extensively renovated in the Baroque and Neoclassical styles. Of its Romanesque stonework there are still elements on the southern wall, especially in the corbels. These have geometric, vegetal and figurative motifs, among which a pig’s head and a human head are distinguished.

Inside, the Romanesque modillions that support the rostrum and the baptismal font were preserved.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismodeourense.gal

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Raczka (2 years ago)
Special choir singing, special interior of church.
Anne Shaw (2 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral I go to Sunday Mass at 6.00 p.m. Wonderful choir and easy to listen to celebrants,not too long winded.
Anne Shaw (2 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral I go to Sunday Mass at 6.00 p.m. Wonderful choir and easy to listen to celebrants,not too long winded.
Simon Larsson (2 years ago)
Not the most beautiful of cathedrals, but there's a partly sculpted ceiling, mosaic floor, and a number of dedicated altars. I'd liked to have had more history on display for interested visitors, as this place appears to be first and foremost dedicated to worship.
Simon Larsson (2 years ago)
Not the most beautiful of cathedrals, but there's a partly sculpted ceiling, mosaic floor, and a number of dedicated altars. I'd liked to have had more history on display for interested visitors, as this place appears to be first and foremost dedicated to worship.
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