Kankainen Manor

Masku, Finland

Earliest record of the manor in Kankainen dates back to 1346, when there were at least two buildings in the village. First manor was built in the 15th century by Klaus Lydekesson Diekn, the commander of Turku castle. Next owners were the famous noble family Horn, who built the present stone manor castle in the mid-16th century.

The third floor was removed during the renovation in 1762-1763 and rebuilt again in 1935. In the 1990s Kankainen was donated to Åbo Akedemi (University of Turku). It’s a rare well-preserved manor representing the building style of Swedish medieval manor castles. Finnish National Board of Antiquities has defined Kankainen as national built heritage. Today it’s used as conference and festive center. Guided tours available for visitors.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1550
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Reformation (Finland)

More Information

yle.fi
www.kankas.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Piotr Mack (2 years ago)
Byliśmy tam na imprezę zoorganizowanej i było bardzo fajnie. Wszystko fajnie zrobione i przyszykowane. Obsługa bardzo sprawna, barmani szybko i profesjonalnie robili drinki. Jedzenie bardzo dobre. Pomimo dużej liczby osób nie odczuwało się tłoku.
Timo Jakonen (3 years ago)
A little manor in South-west Finland countryside. Interesting, but not exactly fancy.
Marko M (3 years ago)
Tienvarsikylteistä ei selvä, ettei kyseessä olekaan yleisesti auki olevasta kahvilasta, joten meni turhaan ylimääräistä aikaa, kun pullakahvien kiilto silmissä kurvasimme pihaan, mutta sitten henkilökuntaan kuuluva henkilö kertoi, että kahvila on avoinna yleisölle vain opastettujen kiertokäynyien aikana. Tienvarsiopasteissa pitäisi heti lukea, että avoinna vain ryhmille.
Sergey Kosourov (4 years ago)
Nice place.
Juho Varumo (5 years ago)
Absolutely lovely venue for weddings and other large parties or gatherings. Truly beautiful rustic chic building with a large & lovely outdoor deck (terassi).
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