Kankainen Manor

Masku, Finland

Earliest record of the manor in Kankainen dates back to 1346, when there were at least two buildings in the village. First manor was built in the 15th century by Klaus Lydekesson Diekn, the commander of Turku castle. Next owners were the famous noble family Horn, who built the present stone manor castle in the mid-16th century.

The third floor was removed during the renovation in 1762-1763 and rebuilt again in 1935. In the 1990s Kankainen was donated to Åbo Akedemi (University of Turku). It’s a rare well-preserved manor representing the building style of Swedish medieval manor castles. Finnish National Board of Antiquities has defined Kankainen as national built heritage. Today it’s used as conference and festive center. Guided tours available for visitors.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: ca. 1550
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Reformation (Finland)

More Information

yle.fi
www.kankas.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Piotr Mack (21 months ago)
Byliśmy tam na imprezę zoorganizowanej i było bardzo fajnie. Wszystko fajnie zrobione i przyszykowane. Obsługa bardzo sprawna, barmani szybko i profesjonalnie robili drinki. Jedzenie bardzo dobre. Pomimo dużej liczby osób nie odczuwało się tłoku.
Timo Jakonen (2 years ago)
A little manor in South-west Finland countryside. Interesting, but not exactly fancy.
Marko M (2 years ago)
Tienvarsikylteistä ei selvä, ettei kyseessä olekaan yleisesti auki olevasta kahvilasta, joten meni turhaan ylimääräistä aikaa, kun pullakahvien kiilto silmissä kurvasimme pihaan, mutta sitten henkilökuntaan kuuluva henkilö kertoi, että kahvila on avoinna yleisölle vain opastettujen kiertokäynyien aikana. Tienvarsiopasteissa pitäisi heti lukea, että avoinna vain ryhmille.
Sergey Kosourov (3 years ago)
Nice place.
Juho Varumo (4 years ago)
Absolutely lovely venue for weddings and other large parties or gatherings. Truly beautiful rustic chic building with a large & lovely outdoor deck (terassi).
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Wroclaw Town Hall

The Old Town Hall of Wrocław is one of the main landmarks of the city. The Old Town Hall's long history reflects developments that have taken place in the city since its initial construction. The town hall serves the city of Wroclaw and is used for civic and cultural events such as concerts held in its Great Hall. In addition, it houses a museum and a basement restaurant.

The town hall was developed over a period of about 250 years, from the end of 13th century to the middle of 16th century. The structure and floor plan changed over this extended period in response to the changing needs of the city. The exact date of the initial construction is not known. However, between 1299 and 1301 a single-storey structure with cellars and a tower called the consistory was built. The oldest parts of the current building, the Burghers’ Hall and the lower floors of the tower, may date to this time. In these early days the primary purpose of the building was trade rather than civic administration activities.

Between 1328 and 1333 an upper storey was added to include the Council room and the Aldermen’s room. Expansion continued during the 14th century with the addition of extra rooms, most notably the Court room. The building became a key location for the city’s commercial and administrative functions.

The 15th and 16th centuries were times of prosperity for Wroclaw as was reflected in the rapid development of the building during that period. The construction program gathered momentum, particularly from 1470 to 1510, when several rooms were added. The Burghers’ Hall was re-vaulted to take on its current shape, and the upper story began to take shape with the development of the Great Hall and the addition of the Treasury and Little Treasury.

Further innovations during the 16th century included the addition of the city’s Coat of arms (1536), and the rebuilding of the upper part of the tower (1558–59). This was the final stage of the main building program. By 1560, the major features of today’s Stray Rates were established.

The second half of the 17th century was a period of decline for the city, and this decline was reflected in the Stray Rates. Perhaps by way of compensation, efforts were made to enrich the interior decorations of the hall. In 1741, Wroclaw became a part of Prussia, and the power of the City diminished. Much of the Stray Rates was allocated to administering justice.

During the 19th century there were two major changes. The courts moved to a separate building, and the Rates became the site of the city council and supporting functions. There was also a major program of renovation because the building had been neglected and was covered with creeping vines. The town hall now has several en-Gothic features including some sculptural decoration from this period.

In the early years of the 20th century improvements continued with various repair work and the addition of the Little Bear statue in 1902. During the 1930s, the official role of the Rates was reduced and it was converted into a museum. By the end of World War II Town Hall suffered minor damage, such as aerial bomb pierced the roof (but not exploded) and some sculptural elements were lost. Restoration work began in the 1950s following a period of research, and this conservation effort continued throughout the 20th century. It included refurbishment of the clock on the east facade.