Kankainen Manor

Masku, Finland

Earliest record of the manor in Kankainen dates back to 1346, when there were at least two buildings in the village. First manor was built in the 15th century by Klaus Lydekesson Diekn, the commander of Turku castle. Next owners were the famous noble family Horn, who built the present stone manor castle in the mid-16th century.

The third floor was removed during the renovation in 1762-1763 and rebuilt again in 1935. In the 1990s Kankainen was donated to Åbo Akedemi (University of Turku). It’s a rare well-preserved manor representing the building style of Swedish medieval manor castles. Finnish National Board of Antiquities has defined Kankainen as national built heritage. Today it’s used as conference and festive center. Guided tours available for visitors.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1550
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Reformation (Finland)

More Information

yle.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Piotr Mack (3 years ago)
Byliśmy tam na imprezę zoorganizowanej i było bardzo fajnie. Wszystko fajnie zrobione i przyszykowane. Obsługa bardzo sprawna, barmani szybko i profesjonalnie robili drinki. Jedzenie bardzo dobre. Pomimo dużej liczby osób nie odczuwało się tłoku.
Timo Jakonen (4 years ago)
A little manor in South-west Finland countryside. Interesting, but not exactly fancy.
Marko M (4 years ago)
Tienvarsikylteistä ei selvä, ettei kyseessä olekaan yleisesti auki olevasta kahvilasta, joten meni turhaan ylimääräistä aikaa, kun pullakahvien kiilto silmissä kurvasimme pihaan, mutta sitten henkilökuntaan kuuluva henkilö kertoi, että kahvila on avoinna yleisölle vain opastettujen kiertokäynyien aikana. Tienvarsiopasteissa pitäisi heti lukea, että avoinna vain ryhmille.
Sergey Kosourov (5 years ago)
Nice place.
Juho Varumo (6 years ago)
Absolutely lovely venue for weddings and other large parties or gatherings. Truly beautiful rustic chic building with a large & lovely outdoor deck (terassi).
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Lorca Castle

Castle of Lorca (Castillo de Lorca) is a fortress of medieval origin constructed between the 9th and 15th centuries. It consists of a series of defensive structures that, during the Middle Ages, made the town and the fortress an impregnable point in the southeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Lorca Castle was a key strategic point of contention between Christians and Muslims during the Reconquista.

Archaeological excavations have revealed that the site of the castle has been inhabited since Neolithic times.

Muslim Era

It has not been determined exactly when a castle or fortress was first built on the hill. The first written documentation referring to a castle at Lorca is of Muslim origin, which in the 9th century, indicates that the city of Lurqa was an important town in the area ruled by Theudimer (Tudmir). During Muslim rule, Lorca Castle was an impregnable fortress and its interior was divided into two sections by the Espaldón Wall. In the western part, there was an area used to protect livestock and grain in times of danger. The eastern part had a neighbourhood called the barrio de Alcalá.

After Reconquista

Lorca was conquered by the Castilian Infante Don Alfonso, the future Alfonso X, in 1244, and the fortress became a key defensive point against the Kingdom of Granada. For 250 years, Lorca Castle was a watchpoint on the border between the Christian kingdom of Murcia and the Muslim state of Granada.

Alfonso X ordered the construction of the towers known as the Alfonsina and Espolón Towers, and strengthened and fixed the walls. Hardly a trace of the Muslim fortress remained due to this reconstruction. Muslim traces remain in the foundation stones and the wall known as the muro del Espaldón.

The Jewish Quarter was found within the alcazaba, the Moorish fortification, separated from the rest of the city by its walls. The physical separation had the purpose of protecting the Jewish people in the town from harm, but also had the result of keeping Christians and Jews separate, with the Christians inhabiting the lower part of town.

The remains of the Jewish Quarter extended over an area of 5,700 square m, and 12 homes and a synagogue have been found; the synagogue dates from the 14th century and is the only one found in the Murcia. The streets of the town had an irregular layout, adapted to the landscape, and is divided into four terraces. The synagogue was in the central location, and around it were the homes. The homes were of rectangular shape, with various compartmentalized rooms. The living quarters were elevated and a common feature was benches attached to the walls, kitchens, stand for earthenware jars, or cupboards.

Modern history

With the disappearance of the frontier after the conquest of Granada in 1492, Lorca Castle no longer became as important as before. With the expulsion of the Jews by order of Ferdinand and Isabella, Lorca Castle was also depopulated as a result. The castle was abandoned completely, and was almost a complete ruin by the 18th century. In the 19th century, the castle was refurbished due to the War of Spanish Independence. The walls and structures were repaired or modified and its medieval look changed. A battery of cannons was installed, for example, during this time. In 1931 Lorca Castle was declared a National Historic Monument.

Currently, a parador (luxury hotel) has been built within the castle. As a result, archaeological discoveries have been found, including the Jewish Quarter.