The sacristy of Vendel Church was made of brick probably in the late 1200s and it is the oldest still existing part of the church. The current church building was completed around the year 1300. Arches were added in the 1450s and the church was enlarged in the 18th century.

Vende church is well-known of its mural paintings, dating back to the year 1451. They were painted by Johannes Ivan and donated by Agneta Krummedik from the near Örbyhus castle.

In 500-800 AD Vendel was a significant market and cultural centre. Archaelogists have found 14 so-called ship burials from the Vendel churchyard. Noblemen were buried there with their horses and equipments between 550-800 AD. Some foundings are displayed in the church's gate building. The historical era is named as a Vendel period after foundings in Vendel area.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: late 1200s
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.orbyhusslott.se

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ingvar Skönstrand (9 months ago)
Absolut en av vackraste kyrka vi har i Upplands län. Rekommenderar ett besök där.
Erik Wallin (11 months ago)
Hör känner man verkligen historiens vingslag.
Gunilla Ekström (15 months ago)
Mycket vackert och stämningsfull kyrka.
Jonas Lyckman (2 years ago)
Fin kyrka från början av 1300-talet. På kyrkogårdens södra sida ligger båtgravarna som gav upphov till epoken Vendeltid.
Erik Tornstam (3 years ago)
Fin kyrka med "besökscenter" med kort information om båtgravarna i Vendel utanför. Fina väggmålningar!
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