Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery

Saint Petersburg, Russia

Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery is dedicated mostly to the victims of the Siege of Leningrad. The memorial complex designed by Alexander Vasiliev and Yevgeniy Levinson was opened on May 9, 1960. About 420,000 civilians and 50,000 soldiers of the Leningrad Front were buried in 186 mass graves. Near the entrance an eternal flame is located. A marble plate affirms that from September 4, 1941 to January 22, 1944 107,158 air bombs were dropped on the city, 148,478 shells were fired, 16,744 men died, 33,782 were wounded and 641,803 died of starvation. The center of the architectural composition is the bronze monument symbolizing the Mother Motherland, by sculptors V.V. Isaeva and R.К. Taurit. By granite steps leading down from the Eternal Flame visitors enter the main 480-meter path which leads to the majestic Motherland monument.

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Details

Founded: 1960
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
enlight.ru

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Павел Поляков (7 months ago)
I want to visit this memorial cemetery that dedicated to horrify Siege of Leningrad. Even in Russian I can't select right words to descrive it...
Otakar Konecny (13 months ago)
No words, no comments..just respect, silence and flowers..
Ali Nouman (13 months ago)
Oh wow great place. Amazing world war 2 history. I loved it.
Vasily Galushkin (14 months ago)
Must!!!
John Smallwood (2 years ago)
From an American soldier, I salute you, the Russian People. Brave and strong, many, many heros. Always remember...
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