Beloselsky-Belozersky Palace

Saint Petersburg, Russia

The Beloselsky-Belozersky palace belonged to the Princes Beloselskiy, a family who claimed descent from Yuri Dolgorukiy, the founder of Moscow. Their first palace was built on the same site by the Fontanka River in 1747, but it was a much more modest affair. The family's fortunes increased thanks to the close relationship between Prince Alexander Mikhailovich Beloselskiy-Belozerskiy and Emperor Paul I, and through marriage to two heiresses to Urals mining fortunes. It was one of those heiresses, the widowed Princess Elena Pavlovna Beloselskaya-Belozerskaya, who commissioned the present palace, petitioning Emperor Nicholas I to allow his court architect, Andrey Stackensneider, to design the building (his only civil commission in the city).

The palace was built 1847-1848, and became renowned for the lavish parties thrown there by Elena Pavlovna. A few decades later, however, the family found the palace too expensive to maintain, and it was sold to Grand Duke Sergey Alexandrovich, brother of Emperor Alexander III, in 1884. He had part of the interiors redesigned in 1888, and in 1897 the facades were restored and first painted in the deep pink that can be seen today.

Nationalised after the October Revolution, the Beloselskiy-Belozerskiy Palace became the headquarters of the Regional Committee of the Communist Party for the centre of Leningrad. In this role, its historic interiors were carefully maintained during the 20th century, despite significant damage in the Second World War, and the original rococo decorations have largely survived intact. The building is now home to a Municipal Cultural Centre (along with several smaller institutions), and hosts regular concerts of chamber music as well as offering occasional guided tours of the state rooms (three or four times per month or by appointment).

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Details

Founded: 1747
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Russia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Natalie Petrova (2 years ago)
The excursion to the Palace lasts about an hour, but it is certainly worth a visit. The interior decorations are amazing.
BradJill Travels (2 years ago)
The Beloselsky-Belozersky Palace is an attractive pink-coloured building situated along the bank of the Fontanka River near the famous Anichkov Bridge and Nevsky Prospekt in St. Petersburg. It was constructed in 1747 for the Belosselsky family. The building possesses an elegant Neo-Baroque exterior highlighted by half figures of human males holding up the ornate pillars. It is very attractive to see from the outside if you happen to be in this area of the city during your visit to St. Petersburg. Note: If you position yourself correctly on the opposite bank of the river, you can capture both the palace and the famous Anichkov Bridge and the landmark horse tamer sculptures in the same picture.
Sa Pr (2 years ago)
First built in 1747 for Prince Mikhail Andreevitch Belosselsky during the reign of Elizabeth of Russia. The palace is now own by the state, and it has a small concert hall that holds concerts and special events.
Hey Jude (3 years ago)
Beautiful building, smells like History
Tommes Januarius (3 years ago)
offering tours only in Russian. nevertheless I joined as I understand some. but mainly I have some knowledge about the history of the palace.thus it was fine. the great halls on first floor are being shown. the palace is in great condition. sometimes there are classical concerts here. worth a visit!!!
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