Charlottenlund Palace

Charlottenlund, Denmark

Charlottenlund Palace is a minor palace near Copenhagen. In its original baroque form it was built between 1731 and 1733 on the foundations of a palace named Gyldenlund. The palace was named after Charlotte Amalie, the daughter of Frederick IV of Denmark and the sister of Christian VI of Denmark. In the 1880s, the palace was extended and rebuilt to reflect the French renaissance style that characterizes its architecture today.

The first royalty moved into the palace in 1869, when Crown Prince Frederick and his wife Lovisa of Sweden moved in. Both Christian X of Denmark and Haakon VII of Norway were born in the palace. The queen dowager Louise lived in the palace until her death in 1926. The royal family discontinued using the palace in 1935 and made it available to the Danish Fishery Survey.

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Details

Founded: 1731
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marianne Pedersen (3 months ago)
Fantastisk slot. Bør anvendes til museum og koncerter.
Karsten Boye Nielsen (5 months ago)
Dejligt sted, ikke mindst på grund af alle de fritløbende hunde.
AC M. (7 months ago)
Toller Park zum Spazieren. Das Schloss selber kann man leider nicht besichtigen. Achtung im Park sind sehr viele Hunde unterwegs, nicht unbedingt mit Leine.
Thomas Repsdorph (7 months ago)
Fantastisk oplevelse i smukke omgivelser.
Shankar Velappan (11 months ago)
It's is a beautiful place to have a walk around and get relaxed !!!
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