La Hougue Bie is a Neolithic ritual site which was in use around 3500 BC. Hougue is a Jèrriais/Norman language word meaning a 'mound' and comes from the Old Norse word haugr. The site consists of 18.6m long passage chamber covered by a 12.2m high mound. The site was first excavated in 1925 by the Société Jersiaise. Fragments of twenty vase supports were found along with the scattered remains of at least eight individuals. Gravegoods, mostly pottery, were also present. At some time in the past, the site had evidently been entered and ransacked.

In Western Europe, it is one of the largest and best preserved passage graves and the most impressive and best preserved monument of Armorican Passage Grave group. Although they are termed 'passage graves', they were ceremonial sites, whose function was more similar to churches or cathedrals, where burials were incidental. Since the excavations and restoration of the original entrance of the passage observations from inside the tomb at sunrise on the spring and autumn equinox have revealed that the orientation of the passage allows the sun's rays to shine through to the chamber entering the back recess of the terminal cell. Although many passage graves showed evidence of continued activity into the Late Neolithic period, La Hougue Bie was abandoned before that time.

On top of the mound were built two medieval chapels, one from the 12th century and the other from 16th century There is also a museum today.

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User Reviews

Caleb Jones (9 months ago)
Knowing that millions of people around the world would be watching in person and on television and expecting great things from him — at least one more gold medal for America, if not another world record — during this, his fourth and surely his last appearance in the World Olympics, and realizing that his legs could no longer carry him down the runway with the same blazing speed and confidence in making a huge, eye-popping leap that they were capable of a few years ago when he set world records in the 100-meter dash and in the 400-meter relay and won a silver medal in the long jump, the renowned sprinter and track-and-field personality Carl Lewis, who had known pressure from fans and media before but never, even as a professional runner, this kind of pressure, made only a few appearances in races during the few months before the Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, partly because he was afraid of raising expectations even higher and he did not want to be distracted by interviews and adoring fans who would follow him into stores and restaurants demanding autographs and photo-opportunities, but mostly because he wanted to conserve his energies and concentrate, like a martial arts expert, on the job at hand: winning his favorite competition, the long jump, and bringing home another Gold Medal for the United States, the most fitting conclusion to his brilliant career in track and field.
Ritch Emilee (10 months ago)
Older than the Pyramids! Fantastic place to see history that is older than history! Pretty much the best preserved passage grave in Europe.
Michael Mallalieu (10 months ago)
When we went it was at the end of the holiday season. It was very quiet not many people. I found it very interesting and moving especially the stone age burial where you could explore by yourself and the memorial to the people who built the tunnels and fortifications who died under the naxos very moving. If your going to visit jersey give this place a go and also the tunnels as well.
VALERIE PHILIPSON (12 months ago)
A very nice place. The tour guide was extremely informative and her talk was very easy to listen to, so many interesting points you may not pick up on by reading odd accounts. The museum was very good too.
Franklin MC (12 months ago)
Wonderful museum. Way more interesting than you'd expect, and very well put together. I would highly recommend if you are in Jersey for a few days - it's a lovely piece of local history.
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