St. Clement Parish Church

Jersey, United Kingdom

The Parish Church of St Clement's origins lie with a privately owned wooded chapel which is thought to have been destroyed during the Norman raids. Construction of the stone church began around the year 911, starting with a chapel which is now the nave. The church became a parish church no later than 1067, because it is known that Duke William II of Normandy granted half the tithes of the church to the Abbey of Montivilliers in Upper Normandy. Only parish churches were permitted to collect tithes.

In the 15th century the church was considerably enlarged by the addition of a chancel and transepts, giving it the usual cruciform shape of most Christian churches. It has been possible to ascertain the approximate date for these enlargements and alterations from the Payn Arms (the three trefoils) in the chancel. The Payns were the Seigneurs of Samares during the 15th century. Also from this period are the gargoyles on the East outside wall, and the murals or frescoes inside the church. When the church was enlarged, the roof was raised and constructed in stone. The line of this may still be observed on the tower arch and buttresses were also constructed to support the weight.

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Founded: 911 AD
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ludgero Miranda (12 months ago)
George Mcnaught (2 years ago)
Beautiful building, and very welcoming
Jersey Kayak Adventures Info (2 years ago)
Quiet and a good place to contemplate in.
Sonja Latimer (2 years ago)
Lovely parish church, traditional service with good hymns, kind welcoming people, good parking.
Bernard Laguerre (3 years ago)
Une petite église qui ne paie pas forcément de mine mais où l'on trouve les restes, bien conservés, de quelques belles fresques dont l'une, impressionnante, représente l'archange Saint-Michel terrassant un dragon.
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