Ville-ès-Nouaux Stone Circle

Jersey, United Kingdom

Ville-ès-Nouaux stone circle is a long chamber and cist-in-circle originally covered by sand dunes. The long chamber was discovered in 1869 by quarrymen looking for stone. By the time the Société Jersiaise became aware of the site two of the capstones had already been broken up. A further seven capstones and two parallel rows of uprights were excavatated.The chamber was further excavated in 1883 which revealed the eastern end of the chamber and the row of curb stones to the north. Further digging a few metres away found a rubble cairn, the cist-in-circle and two smaller cists. The circle, originally covered by a clay mound is 6m in diameter with dry stone rubble between the stones.

At the centre 5 stones formed a cap stoned cist. Nothing was found in the cist other than some ashes and earth.Two levels were noted in long chamber. The lower level was paved with sea pebbles and had few associated finds but the upper layer, which was also paved contained at least sixteen vessels. Nine of these were Beaker type pots protected by stone slabs and six were Jersey bowls. An archers wrist guard was also found.The site was later used as a Bronze Age cemetery where at least 14 urns containing cremated remains were buried.

The age of Ville-ès-Nouaux circle is not sure, but can be constructed in the Neolithic or Chalcolithic age (3250 - 2250BC).

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Founded: 3250-2250 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonio Perestrelo (2 years ago)
Jason Manning (3 years ago)
Ray Taylor (3 years ago)
Good destination if your interested
Roberto Modonesi (4 years ago)
For sure a place to visit....loads of history with a lovely surroundings.
Dne Murray (4 years ago)
Surrounded by a charming park, and St Andrews church to one side, this late-Neolithic gallery is both unassuming and wondrous. Worth seeing.
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