Landshut Castle Ruins

Bernkastel-Kues, Germany

The ruins of Landshut Castle loom over Bernkastel. Archbishop Heinrich von Vinstingen and his successor, Boemund, are said to be responsible for the construction of the castle in 1277. They were the ones who gave the castle its name, 'Landshut', which it is still known by today. The castle, along with all of its treasures, was destroyed by a fire in 1692. However, it is still possible to climb the castle tower. In the inner courtyard of the castle there is a restaurant and a café. The ruins are surrounded by various paths, offering visitors a range of leisurely hiking routes. The Hunsrück mountain range with its deep forests and gorges is also easy to reach from here and well worth exploring.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.bernkastel.de

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shine Yang (2 years ago)
Superb view And food. Not super cheap (17 euro per person) but definitely worth it. However the staff can be super busy and not giving food service. We waited for 10 min until someone has time to seat us. And apparent there were a few tables available. We asked whether we can get a window table but was refused for no reason. Then a couple after us asked whether they can switch from an inside table to a window table the. They said yes you can switch.
Marc Valenzuela (2 years ago)
Beautiful views, great food and reasonably priced. It's a bit difficult to try and find the vehicle route right to the castle but if you can find it it's totally worth it. Otherwise you can park and walk to the castle. The restaurant excerpts both walk ins and reservations. However if you would like a spot inside and next to the glass a reservation is definitely a must.
Sven Goris (2 years ago)
One of the many nice castle ruins available. Love the landscaping they did. So many visitors and urgent needed landscaping made the site even more attractive.
Clay Pender (2 years ago)
With amazing views of the Mossel valley and surrounding vineyards, this castle and restaurant are a great place to hike and enjoy lunch, dinner or a nice glass of the local wine. The restaurant has floor to ceiling glass walls that allows you to enjoy the Vista whilst dining. The dishes on offer are delicious. We enjoyed the venison stew, and the smorgasbord mixed starter. Well worth the visit. Only issue we had was the hike up their is not doable for families with buggies.
Vanessa Viana (2 years ago)
Beautiful view of the Model from the castle. Free parking and access to the tower. Modern restaurant inside with terrace and panoramic view. Can be reached by bus from Bernkastel in some specific times. Worth a visit.
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