Schloss Lieser

Lieser, Germany

Schloss Lieser (Lieser castle) was created on the site of a 1710-built church property. Today's castle was designed by the architect Heinrich Theodor Schmidt in 1884–1887 as the residence for the family of the winery owner Eduard Puricelli. Eduard Puricelli founded and led several gas industries, including in Trier and also in the Rheinböller hut. In 1895/1904-1906 the castle was extended when Maria and Dr Clemens Freiherr von Schorlemer moved into the castle. The castle consists out of two components, the older part in forms of Neo-Renaissance and the younger part in the forms of Art Nouveau.

The outside side is influenced by the Neo-Renaissance, but in outline – according to the architect – Neo-Gothic. The jewellery forms bays, gables and towers are oriented to the German forms of Late Renaissance. The entrance is protected by a tower were two free-standing granite columns rise. The Risalit/Avant-corps on the left side of the main facade is Risalit by large, spread over two floors, is emphasized. The Madonna statue at the corner near the chapel comes from Peter Fuchs, who also worked at the Cologne Cathedral.

The ground plan is located between the Mosel river and the mountains, so that all rooms within the building – as in English country houses - are along a corridor. The basic design of the building with the octagonal hall is based on Italian villas of the 16th (Palladio) and 17th centuries. The ground floor, in which mainly economic areas and the bottling plants were located, has been created very high for flood protection.

In the stairwell between eight large pilasters painted landscapes and architectural motifs from the Mosel region created by Karl Julius Grätz are located. The stairwell window with lead glazing has four painted medallions of Binsfeld and Janssen in Trier. The staircase itself is a self-construction of Trier sandstone with wrought-iron, partly gilded railings.

The first floor is a Beletage with representation rooms. In the octagonal hall, where the stairs end, the sculptor's work, the pillars and the wall panelling have been created in light Burgreppacher sandstone. The ceiling has been plastered and contains several paintings. The first floor contains the rather sober work room, reception room, with pitch pine and oak wood-panelled dining room large with a rich and carved wooden ceiling and several doorframes, the small dining room for everyday use, a poolroom, several garden rooms, guest rooms and a kitchen.

The second floor is the private sector of the house. Is had been equipped with livingrooms, sleepingrooms, tourist rooms and rooms for servants. It also contains a wall table and a marble fireplace. The copper plate of the fireplace has been decorated with a presentation of Hubert Salentin from Düsseldorf.

The hall of Beletage links to the chapel, which is a building on its own. The wallpaintings are by Karl Julius Grätz. The glass paintings are by Binsfeld and Janssen. Peter Fuchs created the saint statues. The mosaic floor with his figural representations was designed by the architect and produced in Mettlach.

A special feature of the paintings is the image originally situated on the terrace sculpture of the wife of the owner. With her old German costume, keys and wallet in hand, it symbolizes allegorical excessive.

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Jan Maarten said 4 years ago
This castle looks magnificent. I think they almost finished the renovation. You should update the pictures and check out the website at http://wwwwschlosslieser.de. There is also a great video at Vimeo https://vimeo.com/user26663250/schlosslieser . You can also find them on Facebook. Just search for Schloss Lieser. To my opinion, this is one of the most nice looking "modern" castles I have ever seen in Germany.


Details

Founded: 1884
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Soham (3 years ago)
Looks really pretty in the night with all the yellow lights
ABRAHAM BECKERS (3 years ago)
A must see when visiting River Mosel. This very beautiful large house, almost a castle is beautiful ly situated at the river banks. Nice wine cellar s and restaurants nearby serving local fresh produce. Enjoy your stay.
andreas schraub (3 years ago)
Nice to take a stop and sit down for minutues, to walk arround, but you can't visit. Thats why no 5 stars.
Arthur Pinzon (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle and enjoyable wine festival. Love this place
Christine Von Hofen (3 years ago)
Scheeen war's
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Quimper Cathedral

From 1239, Raynaud, the Bishop of Quimper, decided on the building of a new chancel destined to replace that of the Romanesque era. He therefore started, in the far west, the construction of a great Gothic cathedral which would inspire cathedral reconstructions in the Ile de France and would in turn become a place of experimentation from where would later appear ideas adopted by the whole of lower Brittany. The date of 1239 marks the Bishop’s decision and does not imply an immediate start to construction. Observation of the pillar profiles, their bases, the canopies, the fitting of the ribbed vaults of the ambulatory or the alignment of the bays leads us to believe, however, that the construction was spread out over time.

The four circular pillars mark the start of the building site, but the four following adopt a lozenge-shaped layout which could indicate a change of project manager. The clumsiness of the vaulted archways of the north ambulatory, the start of the ribbed vaults at the height of the south ambulatory or the choice of the vaults descending in spoke-form from the semi-circle which allows the connection of the axis chapel to the choir – despite the manifest problems of alignment – conveys the hesitancy and diverse influences in the first phase of works which spread out until the start of the 14th century.

At the same time as this facade was built (to which were added the north and south gates) the building of the nave started in the east and would finish by 1460. The nave is made up of six bays with one at the level of the facade towers and flanked by double aisles – one wide and one narrow (split into side chapels) – in an extension of the choir arrangements.

The choir presents four right-hand bays with ambulatory and side chapels. It is extended towards the east of 3-sided chevet which opens onto a semi-circle composed of five chapels and an apsidal chapel of two bays and a flat chevet consecrated to Our Lady.

The three-level elevation with arches, triforium and galleries seems more uniform and expresses anglo-Norman influence in the thickness of the walls (Norman passageway at the gallery level) or the decorative style (heavy mouldings, decorative frieze under the triforium). This building site would have to have been overseen in one shot. Undoubtedly interrupted by the war of Succession (1341-1364) it draws to a close with the building of the lierne vaults (1410) and the fitting of stained-glass windows. Bishop Bertrand de Rosmadec and Duke Jean V, whose coat of arms would decorate these vaults, finished the chancel before starting on the building of the facade and the nave.

Isolated from its environment in the 19th century, the cathedral was – on the contrary – originally very linked to its surroundings. Its site and the orientation of the facade determined traffic flow in the town. Its positioning close to the south walls resulted in particuliarities such as the transfer of the side gates on to the north and south facades of the towers: the southern portal of Saint Catherine served the bishop’s gate and the hospital located on the left bank (the current Préfecture) and the north gate was the baptismal porch – a true parish porch with its benches and alcoves for the Apostles’ statues turned towards the town, completed by an ossuary (1514).

The west porch finds its natural place between the two towers. The entire aesthetic of these three gates springs from the Flamboyant era: trefoil, curly kale, finials, large gables which cut into the mouldings and balustrades. Pinnacles and recesses embellish the buttresses whilst an entire bestiary appears: monsters, dogs, mysterious figures, gargoyles, and with them a whole imaginary world promoting a religious and political programme. Even though most of the saints statues have disappeared an armorial survives which makes the doors of the cathedral one of the most beautiful heraldic pages imaginable: ducal ermine, the Montfort lion, Duchess Jeanne of France’s coat of arms side by side with the arms of the Cornouaille barons with their helmets and crests. One can imagine the impact of this sculpted decor with the colour and gilding which originally completed it.

At the start of the 16th century the construction of the spires was being prepared when building was interrupted, undoubtedly for financial reasons. Small conical roofs were therefore placed on top of the towers. The following centuries were essentially devoted to putting furnishings in place (funeral monuments, altars, statues, organs, pulpit). Note the fire which destroyed the spire of the transept cross in 1620 as well as the ransacking of the cathedral in 1793 when nearly all the furnishings disappeared in a « bonfire of the saints ».

The 19th century would therefore inherit an almost finished but mutilated building and would devote itself to its renovation according to the tastes and theories of the day.