Schloss Lieser

Lieser, Germany

Schloss Lieser (Lieser castle) was created on the site of a 1710-built church property. Today's castle was designed by the architect Heinrich Theodor Schmidt in 1884–1887 as the residence for the family of the winery owner Eduard Puricelli. Eduard Puricelli founded and led several gas industries, including in Trier and also in the Rheinböller hut. In 1895/1904-1906 the castle was extended when Maria and Dr Clemens Freiherr von Schorlemer moved into the castle. The castle consists out of two components, the older part in forms of Neo-Renaissance and the younger part in the forms of Art Nouveau.

The outside side is influenced by the Neo-Renaissance, but in outline – according to the architect – Neo-Gothic. The jewellery forms bays, gables and towers are oriented to the German forms of Late Renaissance. The entrance is protected by a tower were two free-standing granite columns rise. The Risalit/Avant-corps on the left side of the main facade is Risalit by large, spread over two floors, is emphasized. The Madonna statue at the corner near the chapel comes from Peter Fuchs, who also worked at the Cologne Cathedral.

The ground plan is located between the Mosel river and the mountains, so that all rooms within the building – as in English country houses - are along a corridor. The basic design of the building with the octagonal hall is based on Italian villas of the 16th (Palladio) and 17th centuries. The ground floor, in which mainly economic areas and the bottling plants were located, has been created very high for flood protection.

In the stairwell between eight large pilasters painted landscapes and architectural motifs from the Mosel region created by Karl Julius Grätz are located. The stairwell window with lead glazing has four painted medallions of Binsfeld and Janssen in Trier. The staircase itself is a self-construction of Trier sandstone with wrought-iron, partly gilded railings.

The first floor is a Beletage with representation rooms. In the octagonal hall, where the stairs end, the sculptor's work, the pillars and the wall panelling have been created in light Burgreppacher sandstone. The ceiling has been plastered and contains several paintings. The first floor contains the rather sober work room, reception room, with pitch pine and oak wood-panelled dining room large with a rich and carved wooden ceiling and several doorframes, the small dining room for everyday use, a poolroom, several garden rooms, guest rooms and a kitchen.

The second floor is the private sector of the house. Is had been equipped with livingrooms, sleepingrooms, tourist rooms and rooms for servants. It also contains a wall table and a marble fireplace. The copper plate of the fireplace has been decorated with a presentation of Hubert Salentin from Düsseldorf.

The hall of Beletage links to the chapel, which is a building on its own. The wallpaintings are by Karl Julius Grätz. The glass paintings are by Binsfeld and Janssen. Peter Fuchs created the saint statues. The mosaic floor with his figural representations was designed by the architect and produced in Mettlach.

A special feature of the paintings is the image originally situated on the terrace sculpture of the wife of the owner. With her old German costume, keys and wallet in hand, it symbolizes allegorical excessive.

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Jan Maarten said 4 years ago
This castle looks magnificent. I think they almost finished the renovation. You should update the pictures and check out the website at http://wwwwschlosslieser.de. There is also a great video at Vimeo https://vimeo.com/user26663250/schlosslieser . You can also find them on Facebook. Just search for Schloss Lieser. To my opinion, this is one of the most nice looking "modern" castles I have ever seen in Germany.


Details

Founded: 1884
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Soham (3 years ago)
Looks really pretty in the night with all the yellow lights
ABRAHAM BECKERS (3 years ago)
A must see when visiting River Mosel. This very beautiful large house, almost a castle is beautiful ly situated at the river banks. Nice wine cellar s and restaurants nearby serving local fresh produce. Enjoy your stay.
andreas schraub (3 years ago)
Nice to take a stop and sit down for minutues, to walk arround, but you can't visit. Thats why no 5 stars.
Arthur Pinzon (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle and enjoyable wine festival. Love this place
Christine Von Hofen (3 years ago)
Scheeen war's
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