The Roman Bridge (Römerbrücke) is an ancient structure in Trier over the Moselle river. It is the oldest standing bridge in the country. The nine bridge pillars date from the 2nd century AD. The upper part was renewed twice, in the early 12th and in the early 18th century, after suffering destruction in war. It is designated as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Römerbrücke, Trier, Germany
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Founded: 100-200 AD
Category:
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Riccardo Viano (8 months ago)
Historical bridge connecting the city centre with Trier West noce view on the Mosel
Sumer (8 months ago)
Wonderful structure standing tall even after 100s of years
Mads Gregersen (11 months ago)
You need to reflect a little to appreciate the awesomeness of the engineering that build that bridge
Koeka (12 months ago)
Oldest bridges in Germany built in early Roman times? Enough said eh? Check it out!
Michiel Buitelaar (15 months ago)
Not much Roman to detect here. The nearby paths along the river are nice.
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