Museum of Occupations

Tallinn, Estonia

The Museum of Occupations was opened on July 1, 2003, and is dedicated to the 1940-1991 period in the history of Estonia, when the country was occupied by the Soviet Union, then Nazi Germany, and then again by the Soviet Union. During most of this time the country was known as the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic.

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Address

Toompea 8, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 2003
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: New Independency (Estonia)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kai Xiang Teo (2 years ago)
Lovely museum. The phone you're loaned when buying a ticket is the perfect guide to the museum. Felt literal chills at so many points of it, and loved how there was a clear attempt to be objective on this difficult period of history and offer questions instead of answers.
Lance Rhodes (2 years ago)
Really good museum. Story of Estonia told really well. Makes me glad to have been born in the UK and not in eastern europe. Makes you appreciate the freedom we have had all our lives.
Nick Agel (2 years ago)
This museum is a must! It is incredibly well done, interactive and informative. Make sure you give yourself at least a hour and a half to fully experience the everything the museum has to offer
Serena Ferchal (2 years ago)
I thought this museum was very interesting and interactive and showed a glimpse of life in Estonia under occupation. The museum serves a very worthwhile purpose to educate us about these times and about the people who survived and those poor souls who didn't. There was a big school party visiting when we visited so the exhibits were very busy and quite crowded. Some of the exhibits at the start of the museum were quite low lit which I struggle with due to my eyesite. Overall though a very good and informative place to visit.
Josh Moquin (2 years ago)
I thought this museum was wonderful. It was recently renovated and is very interactive. The self guided walking tour was very interesting. If you’re looking for a thorough background on Estonian occupations and freedom - I would highly recommend.
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