Französischer Dom

Berlin, Germany

French Cathedral (Französischer Dom) is the colloquial naming for the French Church of Friedrichstadt. Louis Cayart and Abraham Quesnay built the first parts of the actual French Church from 1701 to 1705 for the Huguenot (Calvinist) community. At that time, Huguenots made up about 25% of Berlin's population. The French Church was modelled after the destroyed Huguenot temple in Charenton-Saint-Maurice, France.

In 1785 Carl von Gontard modified the church and built - wall to wall next to it - the domed tower, which - together with the French-speaking congregants - earned the church its naming. The domed tower is technically no part of the church, there is no access between church and tower, because both buildings have different proprietors. The tower, resembling that of Deutscher Dom, was simply built to give the Gendarmenmarkt a symmetric design. The former church Deutscher Dom, however, consists of church-building and tower as an entity.

In 1817 the French Church community, like most Prussian Calvinist, Reformed and Lutheran congregations joined the common umbrella organisation named Evangelical Church in Prussia (under this name since 1821), with each congregation maintaining its former denomination or adopting the new united denomination. The community of the French Church of Friedrichstadt maintained its Calvinist denomination.

Nevertheless, the congregation underwent already before the union of the Prussian Protestants a certain acculturation with Lutheran traditions: An organ was installed in 1753, competing with the Calvinist traditional mere singing. The singing of psalms was extended by hymns in 1791. The sober interior was refurbished in a more decorative - but still Calvinist aniconistic - style by Otto March in 1905. The beautiful organ has been played, among others, by Thomas Hawkes. Today's community is part of the Evangelical Church of Berlin-Brandenburg-Silesian Upper Lusatia.

Französischer Dom was heavily damaged in World War II, then re-built from 1977 to 1981. Today it is not merely used by its congregations, but also for conventions by the Evangelical Church in Germany.

The church is not a cathedral in the strict sense of the word because it has never been the seat of a bishop.

The domed tower, which is a viewing platform open to visitors, provides a panoramic view of Berlin. A restaurant is located in the basement underneath the prayer hall. The tower also contains the Huguenot museum of Berlin.

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Details

Founded: 1701-1705
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alban Cadu (6 months ago)
A nice and restful spot on a busy day. The church is fairly small but given its location, it's absolutely worth a detour.
Martin Kehlert (7 months ago)
Not so beautiful, lots of French people hang out here
Diana Nuzum (12 months ago)
Beautiful. We had a dinner here for a business meeting. Its absolutely wonderful
Darina Zaretskaia (12 months ago)
Most visit! This architecture is astonishing!!! Explore the nearby area and go inside the cathedral to enjoy the German masterpiece
macedonboy (2 years ago)
The French Church is one of three fine buildings on Gendarmenmarkt. While the dome is not technically part of the church, it's often treated as such and I had the pleasure of both seeing the dome from Gendarmenmarkt and visiting the church for an organ concert. The dome is a very beautiful Neoclassical in the shape of a monopteros containing sculptures of classical figures and topped with a figure of I think the personification of peace holding an olive branch. A fine dome.
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