St. Peter and Paul Church

Kraków, Poland

The Church of Sts. Peter and Paul is a Baroque Jesuit church known best for the statues of the 12 disciples lining the fence at the front.

Commissioned for the Jesuit order, Sts. Peter and Paul was the first baroque church in Krakow. It is one of the most faithful examples of transplanting the architecture of the famous Gesu Church in Rome to foreign soil, with a fine Baroque facade and great dome.

It is said that the Jesuits spent so much money on the ornate white facade and the sculptures that they ran out of money to finish the rest of the building. Indeed, behind the impressive Baroque facade is a church made from ordinary brick.

The stone statues of the 12 Apostles on the fence, looming larger-than-life-size, are replicas of the 18th-century late Baroque originals. The latter can be seen in the side yard.

The interior is not as impressive as the exterior, but worth a look. The crypt contains the sarcophagus of Father Skarga, a famous 17th-century Jesuit preacher.

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Address

Grodzka 52A, Kraków, Poland
See all sites in Kraków

Details

Founded: 1597-1619
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Niko Gritchiano (11 months ago)
On the right in the photo
debrzo1 (2 years ago)
One of oldest churches in Poland.
Dymil Ly (2 years ago)
Nice place in a nice town
Oliwia Biros (2 years ago)
Fantastically preserved romanesque Church built between in the 11th century. It a fortress Church that was used for defensive purposes in the olden days.
Marc Albert (2 years ago)
This is one of Krakow's oldest churches. It's actually part of a monastery, which doesn't seem to be open to the public. When we went the church was open but we could only stand in the back and had a limited view. It seems very pretty. I'm not sure if/when you can actually visit. It's very pretty inside and, since you're probably visiting Peter and Paul next door, you should definitely stop in and take a look.
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