Latvian Academy of Sciences

Riga, Latvia

The Academy of Sciences edifice was built after World War II, between 1951 and 1961, collecting the necessary financing from the newly established kolkhozes in Latvia and - as further expenses increased, collecting the finances as 'voluntary donations' deducted from the salaries of the Latvian rural population.

The building is decorated with several hammers and sickles as well as Latvian folk ornaments and motifs. The spire originally was decorated with a wreath and a five pointed star, which was removed after Latvia regained independence in 1991. Being 108 metres tall, it was the first skyscraper in the republic and was the tallest building until the construction of the Swedbank Headquarters in Latvia.

The building, designed by Osvalds Tīlmanis, Vaidelotis Apsītis, and Kārlis Plūksne, is a cousin to similar Stalin-era skyscrapers, which were representative of what became known as Stalinist architecture (sometimes referred to as Socialist Classicism). The architecture of the skyscraper resembles many others built in the Soviet Union at the time, most notably the main building of Moscow State University. Local nicknames for this building include Stalin's birthday cake and the Kremlin.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Elijas iela 2-6, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 1951-1961
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Soviet Era (Latvia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eija Risen (18 months ago)
For anyone interested in USSR culture, the most representative style of socrealist tower. Reminiscent of buildings like the University of Moscow and Palace of Culture and Science in Warsaw.
Paul Vm King (18 months ago)
It's a bit of a walk from the old town area but very close to Jewish district and little moscow area,worth a visit to see the less tourist part of Riga.
Martin Saraz (19 months ago)
Good weather is definitely a key here, but if visibility is decent, it's absolutely amazing and certainty worth a visit. Structure itself is from the peak of a commie era, but for some reason I loved it. Reminds me of some buildings decades older in the US. 5€ admission is a fair price.
Benedikt T (19 months ago)
Kind of worth a visit, but for 5€ it's overpriced in my opinion. The view is good and you can see basically the whole city. The deck itself is spacious and you can stay how long you want to. However, there is no protection against the elements and historical or other information is scarce.
Tim Michael Vesper (19 months ago)
One of the coolest viewing platforms I've ever been to! 5€ is a decent price and the place is not really crowded. In fact we've been alone on the majority of the 30 minutes we spend up there. Informative signs in German, Latvian, Russian and English are appreciated too!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Narikala Castle

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.