Engelburg Castle Ruins

Mühlhausen, Germany

The remains of the Engelburg castle was probably built in 1260-1280 to the site of 8th century hill fort. The castle was destroyed in 1312 in the war between the Emperor and city states. From the former castle only foundations can be seen.

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Details

Founded: 1260-1280
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

samsu Ilona (3 months ago)
It's an old historical place and it's important as the pictures show and you have to go upstairs to see the remains of the old castle and the view from the top is beautiful I recommend if you come down go to the opposite one Side where the old church and the tower are there You will also find nice things to enjoy and don't forget to ask a passerby or resident about these places, you will know more
Mentos (8 months ago)
Very nice place
Steffen Vanlaack (12 months ago)
There is not much to see, you can actually only see three cellar holes, it is locked and the top of the ruin is almost cut off. Not a special destination!
Kai-Uwe Graeser (19 months ago)
Unfortunately not much to see from a couple of walls. Information about the castle is available. There is a beautiful park near the castle.
Elisabeth Hesselbacher (20 months ago)
Not much to see but the surroundings are lovely
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