Royal Museum of Fine Arts

Antwerp, Belgium

The Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp, founded in 1810, houses a collection of paintings, sculptures and drawings from the fourteenth to the twentieth centuries. This collection is representative of the artistic production and the taste of art enthusiasts in Antwerp, Belgium and the Northern and Southern Netherlands since the 15th century. The museum is closed for renovation until the end of 2017.

The neoclassical building housing the collection is one of the primary landmarks of the Zuid district of Antwerp. The majestic building was designed by Jacob Winders (1849–1936) and Frans van Dijk (1853-1839), built beginning in 1884, opened in 1890, and completed in 1894. Sculpture on the building includes two bronze figures of Fame with horse-drawn chariots by sculptor Thomas Vincotte, and seven rondel medallions of artists that include Boetius à Bolswert, Frans Floris, Jan van Eyck, Peter Paul Rubens, Quentin Matsys, Erasmus Quellinus II, and Appelmans, separated by four monumental sculptures representing Architecture, Painting, Sculpture, and Graphics.

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Details

Founded: 1810
Category: Museums in Belgium

More Information

www.kmska.be
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rosy H. (13 months ago)
Seriously GOOGLE it's been closed for years, people have reported it as closed but you still reject the reports. Get your butt to the museum yourself to see it's been closed and will still be closed for years.
Martin Wynne (2 years ago)
CLOSED. It is closed now, it has been for five years and there is no scheduled date for reopening, despite it having a website which says that is open every day. I came from England to see the museum and found it CLOSED. I phoned the number and an unapologetic apparatchik told me it was closed indefinitely, and he knew the website had the wrong information but he didn't care.
Nicolas de Dampierre (2 years ago)
Closed ! With no relevant information as to the fact that it is closed. Including here, on Google Maps. Stupidity at its best.
Alex Santa (2 years ago)
As the previous reviewer mentioned 2 months ago, this musuem is closed. Disappointing is an understatement. Hours of operation should be adjusted accordingly. What a shame.
Marco Leenen (2 years ago)
In renovation. Opening hours should be changed to reflect that fact.
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