Basilica of Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Valletta, Malta

The Basilica of Our Lady of Mount Carmel is a Roman Catholic church in the Maltese capital Valletta and part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, which includes the entire city of Valletta.

The first church was dedicated to the Annunciation. It was built around 1570 on the designs of Girolamo Cassar. In the 17th century it was given to the Carmelites and thus received its present patronage to Our Lady of Mount Carmel. The façade was redesigned in 1852 by Giuseppe Bonavia. On May 14, 1895 by Pope Leo XIII elevated the church to the rank of Minor Basilica. The church was seriously damaged during the Second World War and it had to be rebuilt.

The new church was built from 1958 to 1981. It was consecrated in 1981. The 42 meter high oval dome dominates both the city skyline and Marsamxett Harbour. It is higher than the steeple of the immediately adjacent Anglican Cathedral in Valletta. The main attraction in the interior is a painting of Our Lady of Mount Carmel dating from the early 17th century. The interior has been sculpted by the sculptor Joseph Damato over 19 years. Striking are the columns of red marble.

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Details

Founded: 1570/1958
Category: Religious sites in Malta

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matteo Allegro (4 months ago)
Rebuilt in 1958 after WWII, "incredibly" does not appear in the vintage photos from the 40s and 50s
Hector Seychell (5 months ago)
It is the church where me and my family have attended as we grew up.
Lora Nielsen (9 months ago)
A must visit for anyone visiting Valletta for the first time. The famous dome of this church can be seen from the nearby cities when approaching Valletta. The church itself is a spacious one and it is a gathering place for the local people on a Saturday morning when the priest has holds a brief speech about life. Wear appropriate clothes or else it will not be respectful for the other visitors. Do not use flash if you want to take pictures inside.
Angela Agius (11 months ago)
Serene & holy place where the soul can roam in blissful atmosphere
Frank PACE (16 months ago)
Remarkable Chapel. Simply beautiful in pretty Mdina.. Worth a visit.
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