Basilica of Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Valletta, Malta

The Basilica of Our Lady of Mount Carmel is a Roman Catholic church in the Maltese capital Valletta and part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, which includes the entire city of Valletta.

The first church was dedicated to the Annunciation. It was built around 1570 on the designs of Girolamo Cassar. In the 17th century it was given to the Carmelites and thus received its present patronage to Our Lady of Mount Carmel. The façade was redesigned in 1852 by Giuseppe Bonavia. On May 14, 1895 by Pope Leo XIII elevated the church to the rank of Minor Basilica. The church was seriously damaged during the Second World War and it had to be rebuilt.

The new church was built from 1958 to 1981. It was consecrated in 1981. The 42 meter high oval dome dominates both the city skyline and Marsamxett Harbour. It is higher than the steeple of the immediately adjacent Anglican Cathedral in Valletta. The main attraction in the interior is a painting of Our Lady of Mount Carmel dating from the early 17th century. The interior has been sculpted by the sculptor Joseph Damato over 19 years. Striking are the columns of red marble.

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Details

Founded: 1570/1958
Category: Religious sites in Malta

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alexander Dimitrov (17 months ago)
Great church near to Valletta center.
Josette Pace (18 months ago)
Very nice church and god bless you all
Dave T (2 years ago)
Nice church which does not seem much from directly outside but the this is the church with the large dome on the valetta skyline.
Ronald Sicharan (2 years ago)
The basilica that makes the Valletta skyline famous. Once you are up close it is hard to get a shot of the dome. But inside is also impressive and gives you a chance to make a donation to the church.
Boris Nikolovski (2 years ago)
Beautiful century-old architecture. Exquisite interior ornament. A feeling of peace and tranquility in the interior.
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