Regensburg Museum of History

Regensburg, Germany

The Regensburg Museum of History, currently resides in a former Minorite monastery, is a museum of the history, art and culture of Regensburg and eastern Bavaria from the Stone Age to the present day.

The former monastery of St Salvator, located in the city's Dachauplatz district, was founded in 1221 by the Bishop of Regensburg Konrad IV of Frontenhausen, Count Otto VIII of Bavaria, and King Henry VII. The three-naved basilica church was considered the largest church of the order in southern Germany until its closure in 1799.

The church and most of its monastic buildings survived, with the monastic buildings converted as barracks and billets for the Bavarian Army, and the church as a customs hall, a drill hall and a hotel until it became the location of the Regensburg Museum of History in 1931.

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Category: Museums in Germany

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Allison Walsh (18 months ago)
The exhibits are almost exclusively in German. But I highly recommend you go even if you don’t speak the language. The collections are extensive from Roman artifacts through various ages in history. Very well done museum with nice pieces. Bonus: free on the first Sunday of every month!
Michael Wright (2 years ago)
Not so good if you have little German, but worth a visit.
Lucina Togno (2 years ago)
Great museum, one of the highlights of my visit. High quality English audio guide available for both the Roman and medieval sections.
kavitha madhubalan (2 years ago)
It's quite interesting and kids 'll also enjoy ...
İhsan Yeneroğlu (3 years ago)
If you like to learn about history of regensburg, you should visit that place. You need max 40 minutes and after you can have a good coffee at the museum cafe.
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