Regensburg Museum of History

Regensburg, Germany

The Regensburg Museum of History, currently resides in a former Minorite monastery, is a museum of the history, art and culture of Regensburg and eastern Bavaria from the Stone Age to the present day.

The former monastery of St Salvator, located in the city's Dachauplatz district, was founded in 1221 by the Bishop of Regensburg Konrad IV of Frontenhausen, Count Otto VIII of Bavaria, and King Henry VII. The three-naved basilica church was considered the largest church of the order in southern Germany until its closure in 1799.

The church and most of its monastic buildings survived, with the monastic buildings converted as barracks and billets for the Bavarian Army, and the church as a customs hall, a drill hall and a hotel until it became the location of the Regensburg Museum of History in 1931.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details


Category: Museums in Germany

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Allison Walsh (11 months ago)
The exhibits are almost exclusively in German. But I highly recommend you go even if you don’t speak the language. The collections are extensive from Roman artifacts through various ages in history. Very well done museum with nice pieces. Bonus: free on the first Sunday of every month!
Michael Wright (14 months ago)
Not so good if you have little German, but worth a visit.
Lucina Togno (15 months ago)
Great museum, one of the highlights of my visit. High quality English audio guide available for both the Roman and medieval sections.
kavitha madhubalan (18 months ago)
It's quite interesting and kids 'll also enjoy ...
İhsan Yeneroğlu (2 years ago)
If you like to learn about history of regensburg, you should visit that place. You need max 40 minutes and after you can have a good coffee at the museum cafe.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Montparnasse Cemetery

Montparnasse Cemetery was created from three farms in 1824. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.

Montparnasse cemetery is the burial place of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also many graves of foreigners who have made France their home, as well as monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris.

The cemetery is divided by Rue Émile Richard. The small section is usually referred to as the small cemetery (petit cimetière) and the large section as the big cemetery (grand cimetière).

Although Baudelaire is buried in this cemetery (division 6), there is also a cenotaph to him (between division 26 and 27). Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction.