St. Jodok Church

Landshut, Germany

St. Jodok Church was founded in 1338 by the Duke Henrik XIV. The church was not yet fully completed, when it was destroyed by fire in 1403. During the reconstruction the chapels were extended (1435-1450). St. Jodok represents the Gothic style with late Gothic (15th century) and 19th century additions.

Of the many outstanding grave stones the particularly noteworthy are the tomb of Heinrich von Staudach (1483) in the crypt and the Peter von Altenhaus (1513 by Stephan Rottaler) under the gallery. The large baptismal font dates from c. 1520.

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Details

Founded: 1338
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Felix Pichlmair (21 months ago)
Mächtige Backsteinkirche im gotischen Baustil ⛪✝
Markus Müller (22 months ago)
Schöne Kirche
Mariela H. (2 years ago)
St. Jodok, auch Jodokskirche genannt, ist nach der Stadtpfarrkirche St. Martin die zweitälteste Pfarrkirche Landshuts. Neben der Martinskirche und Heilig-Geist-Kirche ist sie eine der drei großen gotischen Backsteinkirchen in der Landshuter Altstadt. In der Adventszeit befindet sich auf dem Platz vor der Kirche ein romantischer Christkindlmarkt.
Grzegorz Goj (2 years ago)
Miejsce warte zobaczenia.
Katholische Jugendstelle Landshut (2 years ago)
1x im Monat feiern wir am 1. Freitag im Monat mit Jung und Alt ein Abendgebet mit Liedern aus Taizé. Wir treffen uns in der Krypta von der Pfarrkirche St. Jodok, Landshut. Nehmen Sie sich Zeit für Stille, Musik und Gebet. Nehmen Sie sich Zeit für Gott!
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