Mokrice Castle

Rajec, Slovenia

Mokrice Castle is located on a hill in the northern part of the settlement of Rajec near the Croatian border. First mentioned in 1444, it was rebuilt in the 16th century and in 1941.

The beginnings of the design of the castle garden belong to the period of late Baroque in the 18th century: a symmetrically regular axial scheme was arranged south of the castle. The Baroque stone statues of the Four Seasons, Baroquicised Castle Chapel of St. Anne and the gate portal in the axis of the park have been preserved. In the beginning of the 19th century the garden was redone in English landscape style. A central grassy lawn and a pond with an island were created, numerous walking and riding paths were arranged, and a larger number of trees were planted. Further arrangement of the park was aimed at perfecting the collection of trees, and so even today there are 60 different varieties of trees and shrubbery in the park. In front of the entrance to the castle there is a Roman milliary column set on a special piece of land.

After World War II it was made into a hotel with restaurants and in 1988 a golf course was built in the grounds to the castle.

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Rajec 4a, Rajec, Slovenia
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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

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