Wilhering Abbey, re-constructed in the 18th century, are known for their spectacular Rococo decoration. The monastery was founded by Ulrich and Kolo of Wilhering, who donated their family's old castle for the purpose in 1146. The abbey almost came to an end during the Protestant Reformation, when Abbot Erasmus Mayer absconded with its funds to Nuremberg, where he married. By 1585, there were no monks left at the abbey, which was only saved by the efforts of Abbot Alexander a Lacu, who was installed by the Emperor during the Counter-Reformation.

The abbey buildings were almost entirely destroyed by fire on 6 March 1733. Of the previous buildings, only a Romanesque doorway, parts of the Gothic cloister and two tombs remained. Abbot Johann Baptist Hinterhölzl (1734-1750) made emergency repairs to the church using the remnants of the walls. The church was later completely rebuilt in the Rococo style by Johann Haslinger of Linz. The ceiling and altar paintings are by Martino Altomonte and his son Bartolomeo, while the richly coloured stucco work is by Johann Michael Feichtmayr and Johann Georg Ueblherr. The result is now one of the most significant Rococo buildings in the German-speaking world.

In 1940, Wilhering Abbey was expropriated by the Nazis, and the monks were expelled; some were arrested and sent to concentration camps, while others were forced into military service. The abbot, Dr. Bernhard Burgstaller, was imprisoned and died of starvation in 1941. The buildings were used at first to accommodate the seminary from Linz, and then from 1944 for displaced Germans from Bessarabia and as a military hospital. In 1945, American troops took over the premises. The monks returned in the same year to resume monastic life and to reopen the school. As of 2007, the monastic community numbered 28.

Today the abbey's business enterprises—mainly forestry, farming, and greenhouses—provide a sound economic basis for the monastery. There is also a school for about 450 children.

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Founded: 1146
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tahu Verian (16 months ago)
Der Stiftpark ist schön angelegt, einzig das Gebäude in der Mitte des Parks welches leer steht und Wasserschäden zeigt könnte man sicher ohne hohe Kosten besser da stehen lassen.
Ari Manik (2 years ago)
Beautiful ornament and peaceful
nerealitaate (2 years ago)
Beautiful place. Currently there is some reconstruction work.
Darlene Fetzer (3 years ago)
I have been at this monestary many times as my moms family is from Linz..it is my absolute favorite place on earth..its like being in heaven when you walk in..pictures dont do it ...you have to see it in real... brearhtakingly beautiful..love the blue sky and little cherubs and angels flying all around on the walls..beautiful...
Vytis Karanauskas (4 years ago)
Incredible church. Supremely decorated, worth visiting.
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