Murano Glass Museum

Venice, Italy

The Murano Glass Museum (Museo del Vetro) represents the the history of famous local Murano glass. The palace was the residence of the bishops of Torcello. It was originally built in the Gothic style as a patrician's palace. The building became the residence of Bishop Marco Giustinian in 1659. He later bought it and donated it to the Torcello diocese.

The Glass Museum was founded in 1861. The collection of the museum, one of the most complete in the world, ranges from antiquity to 20th century works including realizations by the famous Barovier & Toso glass company and glass textiles designed by Carlo Scarpa in the late thirties.

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Founded: 1861
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jaume Mira (4 years ago)
Good recommendation if you have half a day. Amazing how they work!
Vivienne Walker (4 years ago)
Stunning. My photos do not convey the beauty. We enjoyed the glass blowing demonstration .... yes we did come home with gifts.
Shannon Wentworth (4 years ago)
The museum itself is housed in a beautiful palazzo with stunning decor. The glass collection is quite varied and shows examples of glass pieces through time. The museum is worth a stop if you are a fan of quality glasswork.
Ault Nathanielsz (4 years ago)
A thorough overview of the history and styles of glass making in Murano. Worth a visit if this is of interest to you. If it does not interest you, save your money and your time.
Guillaume BONO (4 years ago)
A fine museum with quite a lot to see.. I would just regret the lack of "interactivity", like seeing things crafted or restored, and not just as a video.. and even if there is no glassblower, that we could have some reconstitution of a workshop maybe. But otherwise very interesting and eye-pleasing
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