San Pietro di Castello

Venice, Italy

The present Basilica of San Pietro di Castello building dates from the 16th century, but a church has stood on the site since at least the 7th century. From 1451 to 1807, it was the city's cathedral church, though hardly playing the usual dominant role of a cathedral, as it was overshadowed by the 'state church' of San Marco, and inconveniently located.

During its history the church has undergone a number of alterations and additions by some of Venice's most prominent architects. In 1558 Andrea Palladio received his first commission in the city of Venice from the Patriarch Vincenzo Diedo to re-build the facade and interior of St Pietro, but Diedo's death delayed the project.

After St Mark's Basilica became Venice’s official cathedral (it had previously been the private church of the Doge), San Pietro fell into a state of disrepair. It was firebombed during the First World War and only through the efforts of conservation organisations has it been restored to its former state.

Exterior

The church exhibits a muted facade compared to other Palladian designs in Venice. It features a prominent set of four engaged columns with Composite capitals supporting the main pediment and entablature. This is then flanked by a double broken pediment.

The church has a large dome which indicates the church's eccleasiastical importance, sharing an affinity with San Giorgio Maggiore and Il Redentore both churches designed by Palladio. The dome is supported on a drum which has rectangular windows cut into it to let light into the building.

The church's campanile is one of the most precarious in Venice.

Interior

The building has a large central nave with Latin aisles. The transept crosses the church, separating the nave from the presbytery. The crossing point is capped by a large dome. The Vendramin Chapel, located off the left aisle, was designed by the baroque architect Baldassarre Longhena, as was the high altar which he constructed during the middle of the 17th century. The organ was constructed by the Dalmatian craftsman Pietro Nachini who was working in Venice during the 18th century.

The church contains only a few notable works of art including SS John the Evangelist, Peter and Paul by Paolo Veronese and the altarpiece in the Vendramin Chapel by Luca Giordano. The church also contains the Throne of St Peter, a 13th-century seat cut from a funeral stone.

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Address

Castello 70, Venice, Italy
See all sites in Venice

Details

Founded: 7th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MrJack Venice (3 months ago)
Un piccolo sobborgo di Venezia che trasuda storia e cultura in ogni piccolo angolo! Speciale.
Kernel Peralta (6 months ago)
Una isla tranquila, con estación de ferry y exposición de arquitectura, a 30 minutos se encuentra la Pizza San Marco. Zona residencial con un supermercado a 5 minutos.
Catherine Couranton (8 months ago)
Il faut prendre le vaporetto Uno et descendre au Giardini ensuite traverser le Castelo et prendre son téléphone car c'est un peut compliqué. Enfin on arrive à la première église de Venise , l'église San Pietro où le Doge de Venise devait aller et s'agenouiller à l'emplacement d'une pierre blanche. Le prêtre sortait de l'église et invitait le Doge à le suivre. Pour moi c'était une sorte d'allégeance à l'église. C'est un quartier simple et calme avec des maisons rénovées.
Jan Böhm (12 months ago)
Nice place
Oleg Naumov (2 years ago)
Place there See of Venetian Patriarch was situated till XX century. Alas, all original interiors were killed by reconstructions of XVI - XVIII centuries. Now this is the kingdom of Baroque inside. Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photo without flash light. You need to buy a ticket to get in.
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