Bror Hjorths Hus

Uppsala, Sweden

Bror Hjorths Hus, (Bror Hjorth's House) is a museum of the artist Bror Hjorth (1894-1968). The museum has a large collection of Hjorth's work. The house which was built in 1943 was for 25 years the home and studio of Bror Hjorth. It became a museum in 1978.

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Details

Founded: 1978
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anja Vanhatalo (4 years ago)
Trevligt museum med intressant konstnär - kaffe och tre sorters kakor rekommenderas i break mellan visningarna.
Kent Friberg (4 years ago)
Trevligt ateljémuseum med en intressant konstnär. Även en ok utställning med konst från studentnationerna. Trevlig och engagerad personal. Pyssel hörna för barnen. Enkelt kafé med bra priser och gott bröd, man kan sitta på den trevliga innergården.
Per Martins (5 years ago)
Spännande museum. Missa inte det när du besöker Uppsala. Även bra café med uteplatser på sommaren.
Björn Sahlberg (5 years ago)
To move around in the artist's house, atelier and see so many of the works up close is a treat. Great staff adds to the experience and for an art museum it's very family friendly.
Anton Fjodorov (9 years ago)
Tillfällig utställning av Ilon Wiklands illustrationer (Ronja, Karlsson, Bråkmakargatan, Lejonhjärta m.fl). Jag tror att för alla som tycker om hennes stil är denna utställning väldigt inspirerande.
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