Tropaeum Alpium

La Turbie, France

The Tropaeum Alpium ('Victory Monument of the Alps'), was built by the Romans for the emperor Augustus to celebrate his decisive victory over the ancient tribes who populated the Alps. The monument's remains are in the commune of La Turbie, a few kilometers from the Principality of Monaco.

The Trophy was built c. 6 BC in honor of the emperor Augustus to celebrate his definitive victory over the 45 ancient tribes who populated the Alps. The Alpine populations were defeated during the military campaign to subdue the Alps conducted by the Romans between 16 and 7 BC.

The monument as partially restored by archaeologists at the beginning of the 20th century, is 35 meters high. When built, according to the architect, the base measured 35 meters in length, the first platform 12 meters in height, and the rotunda of 24 columns with its statue of an enthroned Augustus is 49 metres high.

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Details

Founded: 6 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

nicolò cerana (13 months ago)
During night time is the best moment. No tourist around, a little too much light pollution, but for me, was acceptable to take several shot s.
GoZa MiTe (2 years ago)
The oldest "building" I've ever visited. The park around this trophy is beautiful and the views are amazing!
D G (2 years ago)
Saw from behind the fence, which was somewhat disappointing, however whatever I saw was impressive.
sean M m (2 years ago)
Good intro to the Roman's influence on the area in the little museum that is below the monument. Great views from the top. Get the Cote d Azure card and enjoy this moment along with other sights in the area.
Brandon Wendell (2 years ago)
Excellent views of Monaco and the surrounding area. Well worth a stop if you're in the area.
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