Tropaeum Alpium

La Turbie, France

The Tropaeum Alpium ('Victory Monument of the Alps'), was built by the Romans for the emperor Augustus to celebrate his decisive victory over the ancient tribes who populated the Alps. The monument's remains are in the commune of La Turbie, a few kilometers from the Principality of Monaco.

The Trophy was built c. 6 BC in honor of the emperor Augustus to celebrate his definitive victory over the 45 ancient tribes who populated the Alps. The Alpine populations were defeated during the military campaign to subdue the Alps conducted by the Romans between 16 and 7 BC.

The monument as partially restored by archaeologists at the beginning of the 20th century, is 35 meters high. When built, according to the architect, the base measured 35 meters in length, the first platform 12 meters in height, and the rotunda of 24 columns with its statue of an enthroned Augustus is 49 metres high.

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Details

Founded: 6 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nathalia DBC (2 years ago)
Amazing place with a magnificent view. The museum is super explicative and you can read informations in different languages. Recommended!
Vincent Vanhecke (2 years ago)
Fantastic view from the monument and nice context in the small museum.
Jack Maxwell-tingey (2 years ago)
Amazing walk up and nice village
Mr. Jones (FBI) (3 years ago)
Enjoyable site that is not very well known. The day we went there was free admission. There is a nice museum on the site that has a lot of interesting history. You can climb to the top of the monument too. There are nice views of Monte Carlo from La Turbie.
Peter Oorschot (3 years ago)
Very nice place found by coincidence when stopping for lunch. Beautiful place just visit for a lunch stop over you won’t regret it. Look at opening times! All explanation in 3 languages, French, English, Italian. Entrance €6,- for adults till 16 for free
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