Capitolium of Brixia

Brescia, Italy

The Capitolium of Brixia was the main temple in the center of the Roman town of Brixia (Brescia). It is represented at present by fragmentary ruins, but is part of an archeological site, including a Roman amphitheatre and museum in central Brescia.

The temple was built in 73 AD during the rule of emperor Vespasian. The prominent elevated location and the three identifiable cellae, each with their own polychrome marble floor, all help confirm that this temple would have represented the capitolium of the town, that is the temple dedicated to the Capitoline Triad of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva. The Capitolium replaced an earlier set of temples, a 'Republican Sanctuary', consisting apparently of four discrete temples that had been erected around 75-90 BC, and refurbished during the reign of Augustus.

The three cellae of the capitolium have been rebuilt, and the walls of the left cella are used as a lapidarium to display local epigraphs found during the 19th centuries. In front of the cellae, are the partially reconstructed remains of a portico, which was composed of Corinthian columns that supported a pediment with a dedication to the Emperor Vespasian.

The complex, and other Roman ruins are located at one end of Via dei Museii, once the original Decumanus Maximus of Brixia, which coursed some 5 meters below the present street level, and along the route of the . Broad stairs rose up to portico from the Decumanus.

Almost entirely buried by a landslide of the Cidneo Hill, the temple was rediscovered in 1823. Reconstruction was performed soon after by Rodolfo Vantini. During excavation in 1826, a splendid bronze statue of a winged Victory was found inside it, likely hidden in late antiquity to preserve it from pillage.

Capitolium of Brixia is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Longobards in Italy. Places of the Power (568-774 AD).

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Founded: 73 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mustafa Arikan (17 months ago)
Good location to be present at. You can take some nice photos and check the old ruins.
Erica Amy Kees (18 months ago)
Brescia! Who knew that you would have such an important museum that still haunts my memories. These gods are not being worshipped anymore but that ancient belief is still felt by what is left, the technical precision of these beautiful masterpieces.
Sarah Norris (18 months ago)
You can see quite a lot of it for free but I definitely recommend buying the combined ticket with the Museo di Santa Giulia! It also includes a guided tour underground and a multimedia exhibition.
Paul Heller (2 years ago)
Beautifully partial restored temple dating from the Roman period 1st century BC. Free to walk around the temple and coliseum, definitely recommend. Not often you can visit such places for free. UNESCO sight. Dogs allowed.
Aleksandra Marszałek (2 years ago)
It's worth to enter and I don't like museum normally :) But inside... You feel the story. You feel special... You feel different...
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