Capitolium of Brixia

Brescia, Italy

The Capitolium of Brixia was the main temple in the center of the Roman town of Brixia (Brescia). It is represented at present by fragmentary ruins, but is part of an archeological site, including a Roman amphitheatre and museum in central Brescia.

The temple was built in 73 AD during the rule of emperor Vespasian. The prominent elevated location and the three identifiable cellae, each with their own polychrome marble floor, all help confirm that this temple would have represented the capitolium of the town, that is the temple dedicated to the Capitoline Triad of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva. The Capitolium replaced an earlier set of temples, a 'Republican Sanctuary', consisting apparently of four discrete temples that had been erected around 75-90 BC, and refurbished during the reign of Augustus.

The three cellae of the capitolium have been rebuilt, and the walls of the left cella are used as a lapidarium to display local epigraphs found during the 19th centuries. In front of the cellae, are the partially reconstructed remains of a portico, which was composed of Corinthian columns that supported a pediment with a dedication to the Emperor Vespasian.

The complex, and other Roman ruins are located at one end of Via dei Museii, once the original Decumanus Maximus of Brixia, which coursed some 5 meters below the present street level, and along the route of the . Broad stairs rose up to portico from the Decumanus.

Almost entirely buried by a landslide of the Cidneo Hill, the temple was rediscovered in 1823. Reconstruction was performed soon after by Rodolfo Vantini. During excavation in 1826, a splendid bronze statue of a winged Victory was found inside it, likely hidden in late antiquity to preserve it from pillage.

Capitolium of Brixia is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Longobards in Italy. Places of the Power (568-774 AD).

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Founded: 73 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Fensterer (38 days ago)
Beautiful roman ruins in the heart of the city center. A symbol of the city's ancient history
Ian Appleby (12 months ago)
Great layered history from 1st century BC to 1900's
Jeroen Ensink (14 months ago)
We had no idea what to expect when we walked our way up to the Roman Forum. We were pleasantly surprised by the low entrance fee and the way we were welcomed and helped when we arrived. Nice video explination, museum at the temple and of course the amphitheatre at the back. Just a must see.
Joey (17 months ago)
Pretty cool remains of Roman temple, including underground remains. It's a bit smaller than advertised and some areas lack descriptions/explanations. Still really cool that it's just in the middle of a city neighborhood. Worth a stop. Just don't accidentally step on the 2,000 year old floor inside...
Rob Godin (Teacher Rob) (17 months ago)
Great place to visit. A little more information needed for the theatre, but everything else was perfect
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