Brescia Roman Theatre

Brescia, Italy

The Roman amphitheatre in Brescia is located immediately at east of the Capitolium. It has been built in the Flavian era and altered in the 3rd century. With its 86 meters diameter, is one of the largest Roman theatres in northern Italy and originally it housed around 15,000 spectators.

In the 5th century, an earthquake has heavily damaged the building. In addition, in later centuries, its remains were incorporated into new buildings built on top of it, largely demolished starting from the 19th century. Of the original structure are preserved the semicircular perimeter walls, the two side passages (aditus) and the remains of the proscenium, as well as many fragments of columns and friezes of the scaenae frons. The most of the orchestra and the ima cavea are still below ground. The archaeological excavations should resume in the coming years.

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Founded: 69-96 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ognian Dimitrov (2 years ago)
There are only ruins left in the theater that are not very interesting. Extremely interesting is the nearby Santuario Repubblicano Museum with preserved frescoes from a republican temple as well as the adjacent Capitolium o Tempio Capitolino.
Alessio Ganci (2 years ago)
An ancient Roman theatre in Brescia. Guided visits are also available if you want to explore it.
Pawel Otfinowski (2 years ago)
no worth to buy the ticket
Lorenzo Rep (3 years ago)
Unexpected, wonderful place
DAVID SNYDER (3 years ago)
Perhaps the least interesting remnant of the ancient Roman city.
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