The building of the Castel Nuovo began in 1279 under the reign of Charles I of Anjou, on the basis of a plan by the French architect Pierre de Chaule. The strategic position of the new castle gave it the characteristics not only of a royal residence, but also those of a fortress. From the very beginning it was called Castrum Novum to distinguish it from the older castles dell'Ovo and Capuano.

During the reign of Robert of Anjou the castle became a centre of culture giving hospitality to artists, doctors and men of letters among whom were Giotto, Petrarch and Boccaccio. The Anjevins were succeeded by the Aragonese Alfonso I who, like his predecessors, used the Castel Nuovo as the royal residence, beginning work of reconstruction and having built, on the outside walls, between the Torre di Mezzo (Halfway Tower) and the Torre di Guardia (Watch Tower) the impressive Triumphal Arch to celebrate his victorious entry into the city of Naples.

The time of the Aragonese saw the passage from the medieval castle-palace to the fortress as it now appears; it was adapted to the new needs of a time of war and the area surrounding the Castle lost the residential character it had under the Anjevins. The structure of the Aragonese building is undoubtedly more massive than its Anjevin predecessor and was quite similar to the present-day castle, which is the result of the clearance works of the early years of the 20th century.

At the end of the 15th century, the French succeeded to the Aragonese, though they did not remain for long as they were succeeded in turn by the Spanish viceroys and the Austrians. During the viceroy period (1503-1734), the defence structures of the castle, needed for purely military purposes, underwent further modification. With the advent of Charles III of Bourbon, who defeated the emperor Charles VI in 1734, the castle was surrounded by buildings of all kinds, warehouses and houses, and this happened time and time again. 

In the first two decades of the 20th century, the Municipal Council began the work of isolating the castle from the annexed buildings in recognition of the historical and monumental importance of the fortress and the need to reclaim the piazza in front of it. The castle is today the venue of cultural events and also houses the Municipal Museum. 

A tour of the museum takes us from the Armoury Hall, the Palatine or Saint Barbara Chapel, the first and second levels of the southern courtyard and the Charles V Hall and the Sala della Loggia which are to host exhibitions and cultural events.

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Founded: 1279
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

IRC067 ******* (12 months ago)
Lovely castle. The tour guide was good and informative. However, I wish we could have been shown more and that you could buy a guide book of the castle
Chris Simonetta (12 months ago)
An icon of Naples, the door with its carvings and the original marks left by attempted conquers was quite captivating. The reason for the 4* and not 5 is the never-ending roadwork around it. Definitely worth a visit though.
Kevin W (12 months ago)
Looks great on the outside and not work going inside. There is a section with paintings and sculptures from the early 1900s and the lost decade. You can get a nice of the water three levels to, but it is hardly worth it as you can see from my attached pics. Save your 6 euros per person for something else.
Daniela Botosaru (13 months ago)
Beautiful Castle for talking pictures from the outside. I paid to go inside and see the paintings, some roman ruins beneath the castle. The think that I really liked was music a the boy was singing inside the church/tower of the castle. It is a nice to visit this if you have some free time in Napoli. Also, the views from the castle are also very beautiful.
Liz Ruddy (13 months ago)
Pretty cool. Some rooms are closed off. We still felt it was worth the 7 euros. The audio guide wasn't really worth the extra 1 euro but that's cheap so do it if you prefer. Just get one and share.
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