Cappella Sansevero

Naples, Italy

The Cappella Sansevero contains works of art by some of the leading Italian artists of the 18th century.

Its origin dates to 1590 when John Francesco di Sangro, Duke of Torremaggiore, after recovering from a serious illness, had a private chapel built in what were then the gardens of the nearby Sansevero family residence, the Palazzo Sansevero. The building was converted into a family burial chapel by Alessandro di Sangro in 1613 (as inscribed on the marble plinth over the entrance to the chapel). Definitive form was given to the chapel by Raimondo di Sangro, Prince of Sansevero, who also included Masonic symbols in its reconstruction. Until 1888 a passageway connected the Sansevero palace with the chapel.

The chapel houses almost thirty works of art, among which are three idiosyncratic sculptures. These statues are emblematic of the love of decoration in late-Baroque, and are made of a marble-like substance that, in whole or in part, was invented by Raimondo. Raimondo also participated in the design of the works of art in the chapel. The Veiled Truth (Pudizia, also called Modesty or Chastity) was completed by Antonio Corradini in 1750 as a tomb monument dedicated to Cecilia Gaetani dell'Aquila d'Aragona, mother of Raimondo. A Christ Veiled under a Shroud (also called Veiled Christ), shows the influence of the veiled Modesty, and was completed in 1753 by Giuseppe Sanmartino. The Release from Deception (Disinganno) by Francesco Queirolo of Genoa serves as a monument to Raimondo's father.

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Details

Founded: 1590
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

World Wanderer (11 months ago)
Velo Cristo is a must see when visiting Naples!
World Wanderer (11 months ago)
Velo Cristo is a must see when visiting Naples!
Daniel Winter (inverno) (11 months ago)
8€ Entry Fee is way too much for this! Check Out the Google Photos and save the money for 2(!) pizzas!
Daniel Winter (inverno) (11 months ago)
8€ Entry Fee is way too much for this! Check Out the Google Photos and save the money for 2(!) pizzas!
H. D. (13 months ago)
Amazing sculptures but it’s only a small chapel which is not worth 10€ ticket! Comparing what you can see in free churches and chapels, it’s nothing special. The whole visit takes only 10 minutes! Not recommended!
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