Virgil's tomb

Naples, Italy

Virgil's tomb is a Roman burial vault in Naples, said to be the tomb of the poet Virgil (70-19 BCE). It is located at the entrance to the old Roman tunnel known as the grotta vecchia or cripta napoletana in the Piedigrotta district of the city, between Mergellina and Fuorigrotta. It is a small structure, with a small dome of rocks located at the top of the park.

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Details

Founded: 19 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Luca Andreoletti (3 months ago)
Tomba monumentale vicina a quella di Leopardi sita in un parco con una bella vista sulla città. Nel complesso merita sicuramente una visita
Evgenia S (5 months ago)
It is a small vertical park, 5 minutes from the metro station. The place is very interesting and rather crowdless. From the top of it opens a great view. Also there is a Virgil's tomb. And next to it it feels a little bit terrifying but really exciting. The air is cold and vet there and the wind howls in that large crypt in a rock. I will never forget that feeling. Also I will also remember this place because I tried to get there 8 times during a year and a half and it was always closed during its working hours. So be ready that you may meet its closed gates.
VJC 8523 (11 months ago)
Beautiful hidden gem!
Johnny M (11 months ago)
Very small park, open from 09-14h. The tomb is cool with a good view, but there really wasn't much to see. You go here just to know that you paid Virgil some respect :). The caves are closed off as others mentioned.
Roy Nieterau (11 months ago)
Pretty tombe and great view from the top. Nevertheless the caves seem closed and going from the reviews it has been like that for over a year. It's best to view it as a nice little park, then you'll have the right expectations. The areas that seemed closed off appear desolated and feel as if it hasn't been taken care off for a very long time.
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