Meggenhorn Castle

Meggen, Switzerland

Meggenhorn Castle was built in 1868-1870 by Edouad Hofer-Grosjean from Mulhouse and in 1926 equipped with a Welte Philharmonic Organ. Today, it is mostly used as a tourist attraction and reception venue.

The castle was inspired by Châteaux Chambord in the Loire Valley France and the grounds are open to the public since 1974. The castle overlooks a vineyard and is a popular place for picnicking with access to the lake for swimming. There is also a family playground with farm animals that children can see close up. The castles view extends in over a 180° arc from the city of Lucerne, Pilatus and Rigi.

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Details

Founded: 1868
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tapan Chandra (2 years ago)
Awesome park with awesome views. Must go to this not so well known place when in Lucerne. Walk through round the park
Jane Parent (2 years ago)
Sweet people at the cafe. Beautiful grounds and walking paths.
Katie Ludwig (2 years ago)
A great place to spend the day! It’s so peaceful and quiet and the grounds are beautiful.
Robert Wiencek (2 years ago)
Nice place to have rest.
Agatha Brandão de Oliveira (2 years ago)
Such a beautiful and quite place (during winter!) will be back in summer just to check it out!
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