San Salvador de Coruxo Church

Vigo, Spain

The Coruxo Church is an impeccable example of religious architecture in Vigo with beautiful skylights. Alongside the churches in Bembrive and Castrelos, the Romanesque temple in Coruxo is one of the best preserved in Vigo. The church of San Salvador was built in the 12th century; it belonged to the Benedictines until the 14th century and later became the parish church. Many of its Romanesque art ornaments have been lost: it retains three semicircular apses, but the windows of the central one were walled, thus covering the decorative elements.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismodevigo.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jesus Angel Balado Alonso (3 years ago)
Lovely
Eligio González (3 years ago)
I give it a star, because the only time I went there, it was for a funeral of a partner's mother, so I'm sorry for my vote or score, otherwise I can't comment
JOSE NUÑEZ CORRALES (3 years ago)
The Church is interesting because of how old it is, its construction, but the rest of the parish has little to do
Patry F.F. (3 years ago)
It is a beautiful site with very good views as all the river and very good neighbors
Francisco Varela (3 years ago)
Unrivaled setting for praying wooden dolls. The priest, as usual, speaks in Latin and gives the turra in perfect Castilian.
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