Museums in Germany

Pomeranian State Museum

The Pomeranian State Museum is primarily dedicated to Pomeranian history and arts. The largest exhibitions show archeological findings and artefacts from the Pomerania region and paintings, e.g. of Caspar David Friedrich, who was a Greifswald local. The museum was established in the years of 1998 to 2005 at the site of the historical Franziskaner abbey.
Founded: 1998 | Location: Greifswald, Germany

Lutherhaus

The Lutherhaus is a writer's house museum in Lutherstadt Wittenberg. Originally built 1504 as part of the University of Wittenberg, the building was the home of Martin Luther for most of his adult life and a significant location in the history of the Protestant Reformation. Luther was living here when he wrote his 95 Theses. The Augusteum is an expansion to the original building that was constructed after Lut ...
Founded: 1504 | Location: Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Germany

Roman Archeological Park

In the first century BC. the Romans set their sights on the Lower Rhineland. They erected a military camp on the Fürstenberg so that they could advance into Germania to the east of the Rhine by crossing the river Lippe. After the devastating defeat of Varus by the Germanic forces led by Arminius in 9 AD, the river Rhine became the eastern frontier of the Roman empire. A port and a settlement developed north of th ...
Founded: 98 AD | Location: Xanten, Germany

Roemer- und Pelizaeus-Museum

The Roemer- und Pelizaeus-Museum Hildesheim, mostly dedicated to Ancient Egyptian and Ancient Peruvian art, also includes the second largest collection of Chinese porcelain in Europe. Furthermore, the museum owns collections of natural history, ethnology, applied arts, drawings and prints, local history and arts, as well as archeology. Apart from the permanent exhibitions, the museum hosts temporary exhibitions of other a ...
Founded: | Location: Hildesheim, Germany

Roman Villa Borg

The Roman Villa Borg is a reconstructed Roman villa rustica. Discovered at the end of the 19th century, the site was excavated in the late 1980s. Reconstruction work, which began in the mid-1990s, was virtually completed in late 2008 although further excavation work is still continuing. The site is a popular tourist attraction with some 50,000 visitors per year. It was Johann Schneider, a local schoolteacher, who around ...
Founded: | Location: Borg, Germany

Schloßbergmuseum Chemnitz

Schloßberg was a castle and Benedictine monastery hill built by the Emperor Lothar III around 1136 near Chemnitz. The monastery existed almost 400 years and was rebuilt many times. The last Gothic appearance was built between 1488 and 1522. Around the 1540 Benedictines left the site which fell to the Saxon Electors. The building was used as an administration and hunting lodge.In 1931 the new city museum was opened.
Founded: c. 1136 | Location: Chemnitz, Germany

Detmold Open-air Museum

The Detmold Open-air Museum (LWL-Freilichtmuseum Detmold) was founded, together with the Hagen Open-air Museum, in 1960, and was first opened to the public in the early 1970s. Over 100 historic, rural buildings were transported and reconstructed from across the state, including schools, farmhouses, thatched cottages, and windmills. The large bucolic fields and ponds are available for horse-drawn carriage ri ...
Founded: 1960 | Location: Detmold, Germany

Morsbroich Museum

The Museum Morsbroich is a former Baroque castle, now a municipal museum for the exhibition of modern and contemporary art. It also provides the setting for theatrical productions and other cultural events under the title 'Morsbroich Summer'. In 1948 the castle was leased to the city of Leverkusen. Since 1951 it is used as an exhibition space. In 1974 it was sold to the city of Leverkusen and subsequently reno ...
Founded: 18th century | Location: Leverkusen, Germany

Martin Luther's Death House

Martin Luther"s Death House (Martin Luthers Sterbehaus) is the historic building in Eisleben, where it was incorrectly thought that Martin Luther died on 18 February 1546. Since then it has become a museum and a UNESCO world heritage site. The city of Eisleben, located in Saxony-Anhalt, is also where Martin Luther was born and baptised; his birth house is also a UNESCO world heritage site and museum. It is no ...
Founded: 1546 | Location: Eisleben, Germany

Groß Raden Archaeological Museum

The Groß Raden Archaeological Open Air Museum is in a depression that borders directly onto the lake of Groß Radener See. On a peninsula in front of that lies its circular castle rampart, visible from afar, which has a diameter of 50 metres. From 1973 to 1980 extensive excavations were carried out here, led by Ewald Schuldt, during the course of which the remnants of a Slavic settlement dating to the 9th and 1 ...
Founded: | Location: Groß Raden, Germany

Martin Luther's Birth House

Martin Luther"s Birth House (Martin Luthers Geburtshaus) is a museum in Eisleben, Germany. The actual house in which Luther was born no longer exists, it having been burnt completely to the ground in 1689. The German religious reformer Martin Luther was born there in 1483. Opened to the public in 1693, it is a World Heritage Site. In 2005-2007 an expansion was added for visitors; the ensemble has since rece ...
Founded: 1693 | Location: Eisleben, Germany

Hexenbürgermeisterhaus

Hexenbürgermeisterhaus was built in 1571. It was the home of so-called Hexenbürgermeister, 'Witch Mayor', Hermann Cothmann (1629-1683), who was famous for leading the last bloody witch trials. Today the house is a museum and well-preserved sample of Weser Renaissance style.
Founded: 1571 | Location: Lemgo, Germany

Widow's Palace

The ducal Widow"s Palace in Plön was the widow"s seat of the Duchess Dorothea Christina (Dorothea Christine). During its history the building has also served as an orphanage and was modified several times. Today it houses Plön"s district museum. The Widow"s Palace was originally a stately home dating to the Middle Ages, which was mentioned for the first time around 1385, and was a fief of ne ...
Founded: 1540 | Location: Plön, Germany

Celtic Museum Heuneburg

The Celtic Museum Heuneburg features the original finds discovered throughout the many years of excavation at the Heuneburg. The exhibits underline the active trading contacts with other cultures: Greek imports, amber from the Baltic Sea, jewellery from Slovenia, transport amphoras from Marseilles. From 1983 the former tithe barn in Hundersingen has been used as the Heuneburg Museum. This museum was operated until 2000 b ...
Founded: 700 BC | Location: Hundersingen, Germany

Martberg Archaeological Park

Nearly 200 m above the Mosel river next to Pommern and Karden lays the high plateau of the Martberg. Its name still reminds you of the celtic-roman god Lenus-Mars who has been worshipped here in ancient times. In the celtic period, around 100 BC, the Martberg was a central town an oppidum of the local celtic tribe called Treveri. According to current research the plateau of 45 ha was densly settled with small houses made ...
Founded: | Location: Pommern, Germany

Römerhalle

Römerhalle (Roman hall) is a museum where the Roman finds from the Roman Kreuznach and its environment are presented. Outstanding exhibits two mosaic floors from the immediately adjacent to the Romans Roman Peristylvilla hall of the 3rd Century AD Once a magnificent mansion with over 5,000 square meters of covered space and more than fifty rooms on the ground floor alone, are now only remnants of the foundation walls ...
Founded: 250 AD | Location: Bad Kreuznach, Germany

European Archaeological Park of Bliesbruck-Reinheim

The European Archaeological Park at Bliesbruck-Reinheim, in the German municipality of Gersheim and the French municipality of Bliesbruck, is a cross-border project which combines excavations and reconstructions of Celtic and Roman finds with exhibition and educational facilities. It was created in 1989 as a result of the archaeological work being done on both sides of the Franco-German border. Together with archaeologica ...
Founded: | Location: Reinheim, Germany

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Wroclaw Town Hall

The Old Town Hall of Wrocław is one of the main landmarks of the city. The Old Town Hall's long history reflects developments that have taken place in the city since its initial construction. The town hall serves the city of Wroclaw and is used for civic and cultural events such as concerts held in its Great Hall. In addition, it houses a museum and a basement restaurant.

The town hall was developed over a period of about 250 years, from the end of 13th century to the middle of 16th century. The structure and floor plan changed over this extended period in response to the changing needs of the city. The exact date of the initial construction is not known. However, between 1299 and 1301 a single-storey structure with cellars and a tower called the consistory was built. The oldest parts of the current building, the Burghers’ Hall and the lower floors of the tower, may date to this time. In these early days the primary purpose of the building was trade rather than civic administration activities.

Between 1328 and 1333 an upper storey was added to include the Council room and the Aldermen’s room. Expansion continued during the 14th century with the addition of extra rooms, most notably the Court room. The building became a key location for the city’s commercial and administrative functions.

The 15th and 16th centuries were times of prosperity for Wroclaw as was reflected in the rapid development of the building during that period. The construction program gathered momentum, particularly from 1470 to 1510, when several rooms were added. The Burghers’ Hall was re-vaulted to take on its current shape, and the upper story began to take shape with the development of the Great Hall and the addition of the Treasury and Little Treasury.

Further innovations during the 16th century included the addition of the city’s Coat of arms (1536), and the rebuilding of the upper part of the tower (1558–59). This was the final stage of the main building program. By 1560, the major features of today’s Stray Rates were established.

The second half of the 17th century was a period of decline for the city, and this decline was reflected in the Stray Rates. Perhaps by way of compensation, efforts were made to enrich the interior decorations of the hall. In 1741, Wroclaw became a part of Prussia, and the power of the City diminished. Much of the Stray Rates was allocated to administering justice.

During the 19th century there were two major changes. The courts moved to a separate building, and the Rates became the site of the city council and supporting functions. There was also a major program of renovation because the building had been neglected and was covered with creeping vines. The town hall now has several en-Gothic features including some sculptural decoration from this period.

In the early years of the 20th century improvements continued with various repair work and the addition of the Little Bear statue in 1902. During the 1930s, the official role of the Rates was reduced and it was converted into a museum. By the end of World War II Town Hall suffered minor damage, such as aerial bomb pierced the roof (but not exploded) and some sculptural elements were lost. Restoration work began in the 1950s following a period of research, and this conservation effort continued throughout the 20th century. It included refurbishment of the clock on the east facade.