St. Catherine's Church

Turku, Finland

The Church of St. Catherine in Nummi suburb represents the medieval church building tradition. The construction began in the 1340s, the sacristy was completed first and the church later. Bishop Hemming and Bishop Thomas of Växjö consecrated the church on 22 January 1351.

Finnish National Board of Antiquities has named the church site as a national built heritage.

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Address

Kirkkotie 46, Turku, Finland
See all sites in Turku

Details

Founded: 1351
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reijo Närjä (11 months ago)
Kaunis vanha kirkko
Markku Miettinen (11 months ago)
Siisti kirkko ja sitä ympäröivä hautausmaa saa kyllä ainakin minulta ja sieltä monet muut hautuumaat voisivat mennä ottamaan mallia miten sitä hautausmaata oikeesti hoidetaan ja pidetään siistinä ja kivet suorassa..
Eija Mäkinen (12 months ago)
Pyhä paikka
Aleksi Elovaara (14 months ago)
Upea keskiaikainen kirkko.
Mike Rautio (2 years ago)
Kirkosta vaikea sanoa mitään, kaunis vanha kirkko
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