Vaksala Runestone

Uppsala, Sweden

The Vaksala Runestone is one of the approximately forty runestones made by the runemaster Öpir, who signed this inscription and was active in the late 11th and early 12th century in Uppland. This runestone style is characterized by slim and stylized animals that are interwoven into tight patterns. The animal heads are typically seen in profile with slender almond-shaped eyes and upwardly curled appendages on the noses and the necks. The runic inscription states that Ígulfastr arranged and Öpir carved the runestone on the behest of the widow and the daughter of the deceased.

The Vaksala Runestone was used as building material for the construction of a wall in the churchyard. It has been removed from the wall and placed in its present location in the churchyard.

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Vaksalagatan, Uppsala, Sweden
See all sites in Uppsala

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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