The Saint Petersburg Botanical Garden, also known as the Botanic Gardens of the Komarov Botanical Institute, is the oldest botanical garden in Russia. It consists of outdoor and indoor collections situated on Aptekarsky Island in Saint Petersburg and belongs to the Komarov Botanical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

The garden was founded by Peter the Great in 1714 as a herb garden in order to grow medicinal plants and re-established as a botanical institution under the name Imperial Botanical Garden in 1823. Ivan Lepyokhin was in charge of the botanical garden from 1774 until 1802. Beginning in 1855, Eduard August von Regel was associated with the garden, first as Scientific Director and then as Director General (1875-1892). Regel had a particular fascination with the genus Allium, overseeing collections of these plants in the Russian Far East and writing about them in two monographs. More than 60 of the alliums he identified bear his name, e.g., A. giganteum Regel and A. rosenbahianum Regel. Many alliums can be viewed in the Northern Yard of the garden.

In 1930 the garden became subordinate to the Academy of Sciences of the Soviet Union and in 1931 was merged with the Botanical Museum into the Botanical Institute.

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    Founded: 1714
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    User Reviews

    Roger Pratchet (6 months ago)
    Good trees collection, nice greenhouse rare plants collection. Impossible to take excursion without group.
    Saleem ur Rahman (7 months ago)
    What a beautiful place in spb. I will visit it again especially it's
    Anton Andreevych (7 months ago)
    It's very nice. Some sort of portal from autumn to summer.
    Pavel Sushko (9 months ago)
    It's a great place if you enjoy nature and whatnot. Kids would probably get slightly bored of this place. Tours were nice but I personally found them slightly repetitive, although it's probably because I'm not a nature enthusiast. What I found to be the most interesting is the history of the place, you should ask your tour guide about the historical value of this place, you will not regret it.
    SUPER SPIRITS (13 months ago)
    Every time I go to St. Petersburg, I try to visit my favorite bot. I go there at any time of the year, and always enjoy it. Even in winter, walking around the park is worth the time. Against the background of bare deciduous trees, coniferous trees are especially well seen, and there are a lot of them in the park and they are very different. Only in the winter and you'll see ... And certainly visiting the winter greenhouses, this is a miracle! I highly recommend all the offered excursions. Beauty is indescribable, and prices are not prohibitive.
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