Broholm Castle

Gudme, Denmark

Broholm is a private estate and manor house, first mentioned in 1326 when owned by Absalon Jonsen Ulfeldt. From 1641, it was inherited by the Skeel and Sehested families for whom it was the seat from 1759 to 1930. The main wing with its round tower was built for Otte Skeel in 1644. In 1839, it was renovated in the Neo-Gothic style by Gustav Friedrich Hetsch. The corner tower was added in 1895 and the south wing in 1905. Substantial renovation and adaptation work was carried out in the 1920s and the 1950s. Part of the premises has now been converted into a hotel. There is also a museum of antiquities on the estate.

The Museum of North Antiquities is part of the manor and it has 10,000 antiquaries collected by Sehested, then (1881), owner of the manor. These antiquaries are a collection from an area of 5 miles (8.0 km) around the manor house. These finds are dated to the stone, bronze and iron ages. In addition, some gold ornaments were also found on the estate. Excavations revealed the Broholm gold hoard with an approximate weight of 4.15 kg. Deemed to be the biggest gold hoard of the country from the Migration Period, items include golden bracteates, as well as necklaces and pieces worn on the arm.

The estate is also famous for breeding of Broholmer dogs, of the St. Bernard Dog class of dogs with short hair with links to the pedigree of German Bulldog. These dogs are reported to be a common sight in the Copenhagen neighborhood. It is a national breed and the Copenhagen Kennel Club was charged with breeding them and establishing their pedigree. The Danish dog is also reported to be closely related to the English Mastiff. The better specimens are bred in the Broholm estate and hence given the name Broholmer Dogs.

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Address

Broholmsvej 32B, Gudme, Denmark
See all sites in Gudme

Details

Founded: 1644
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Randall (45 days ago)
If Carlsberg did castles... WOW. If only one could give 6 stars. This place is just magical. The service is great, the location (a photographers dream), the peace and quite. It is staying in someone's home and a museum and a hotel all in one. Be sure to have dinner at least once and enjoy the local beer, aquavit and breakfasts. The Fairytale path which takes around 30 mins does a wonderful, forest clad, loop of the castle, the building of which is full of surprises... Best place I have stayed all year for sure.
Montablan Films (9 months ago)
Definitely worth a visit . Restaurant and hotel reported to be excellent. Although I went in to have a look at the rear of the castle where the castle owner has a fantastic collection of flint arrowheads , stone axes, whale bones and an Elk skeleton . Now why wouldn't you go have a look.
Candace Moore (10 months ago)
Very cool experience, the castle itself is stunning with authentic furnishings throughout and the dinner service was delicious. Overall it was luxurious and the staff was great.
peter radford (12 months ago)
Very impressive.Lovely place.Worth a visit.
Lothar Gutjahr (13 months ago)
Only a little too expansive. Great atmosphere.
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