St. Hedwig's Cathedral

Berlin, Germany

St. Hedwig's Cathedral is the seat of the archbishop of Berlin. It was built in the 18th century as the first Catholic church in Prussia after the Protestant Reformation by permission of King Frederick II. The intention of Frederick was to offer the numerous Catholic immigrants who had arrived in Berlin, especially those from Upper Silesia, a place of worship. The church was therefore dedicated to the patron of Silesia and Brandenburg, Saint Hedwig of Andechs. The building was designed by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff modeled after the Pantheon in Rome and construction started in 1747, interrupted and delayed several times due to economic problems. It was not opened until November 1, 1773 when the king's friend, Ignacy Krasicki, then Bishop of Warmia (later Archbishop of Gniezno), officiated at the cathedral's consecration.

After the Kristallnacht pogroms that took place over the night of 9–10 November 1938, Bernhard Lichtenberg, a canon of the cathedral chapter of St Hedwig since 1931, prayed publicly for Jews in the evening prayer following. Lichtenberg was later jailed by the Nazis and died on the way to the concentration camp at Dachau. In 1965 Lichtenberg's remains were transferred to the crypt at St. Hedwig's.

The cathedral burned down completely in 1943 during air raids on Berlin and was reconstructed from 1952 up to 1963.

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Details

Founded: 1773
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael (19 months ago)
Catholic church in Berlin
Andrew Muttiah (2 years ago)
This Cathedral is amazing and beautiful. It is right next to the Humboldt Library and has an amazing view. When you visit this location, sit on the steps of the Cathedral during the sunset and watch towards the Library.
Viktor Olivér Lőrincz (2 years ago)
Great.
Rachel Yapp (3 years ago)
Very cool building with an interesting history.
Antoine M (3 years ago)
A Neoclassical Roman Catholic cathedral on the Babelplatz in Berlin. Completed 1773 with the dome added 1887 and the interior completed 1832. It was reconstructed 1963 after it was heavily damaged by Allied bombing in 1943. It has the most impressive interior I've ever seen with exquisite ambience that welcomes everyone from all backgrounds. It's wheelchair friendly. There's a parking lot here or public parking nearby. Great for children to visit. A must visit during the evening as it lights up discreetly to enhance the atmosphere. The dark magenta red ambience is what intrigued me the most! It is in the same block as Berlin State Opera.
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